Category Archives: Reviews

Homebrew Recipe for Pliny the Elder – Brewing MoreBeer’s Pliny the Elder Recipe Kit

Updated: 6/17/2024

MoreBeer has collaborated directly with Vinnie Cilurzo, owner and brewer at Russian River Brewing Company, to bring you recipe kits for Pliny the Elder double IPA as part of their BrewMaster Series of recipe kits.  From the description “This is THE original Pliny recipe”.


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Hands on Review: Safecid Beer Line Cleaner

This review is by Homebrew Finds Contributor Brad Probert.  Brad is an engineer, expert homebrewer and experienced reviewer.  Grab a link to Brad’s website at the end of this review.

Safecid Cleaner

Those of us that have kegerators know that cleaning the beer lines is a necessary thing. We also know that cleaning them is a pretty unexciting event. Products for cleaning them are generally unexciting as well because they’re all pretty similar. There is one product that is different- Safecid Beer Line Cleaner.


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These are affiliate links. Note that multiple variations of these products may be available, as such a different version may appear at these links


Safecid has both an acid cleaner and an alkaline/caustic cleaner. The cleaners are as potent as other cleaners, but their patented chemistry makes it non-toxic. This means it is neither harmful to people (skin, eyes), nor harmful to the water supply when rinsed down the drain. And that’s what makes it different from other cleaners.

Alkaline Cleaner Distinct Blue Color

See-Through Volume Markings

The Brewer’s Association publishes draft beer cleaning guidelines for bars/breweries. They recommend a cleaning period of every 2 weeks, based on research looking at bacteria build-up in the lines. The research looked at the growth of both aerobic bacteria (leading to sour and vinegar off-flavors) and anaerobic bacteria (leading to butter and caramel off-flavors). This bi-weekly cleaning is to be done with an Alkaline cleaner, and then every 3 months an acid cleaner should be used. The alkaline cleaner deals with organic compounds (bacteria) and the acid cleaner deals with inorganic compounds (beer stone). They point out that the cleaning frequency is not dependent on how much beer is flowed through the lines- busy taps or slow ones alike.

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Hands on Review: Thermapen ONE Thermometer!

thermapen one hands on review

Updated: 5/3/2024

The Thermapen is a thermocouple thermometer produced by ETI, Ltd and sold by ThermoWorks. It’s used by restaurants, home cooks, homebrewers, grillers, bbq-ers and more


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My Thermapen ONE Review is hosted on my BBQ site BBQ Finds – it covers use for homebrewing and more.

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Hands on Review: Kegland Cannular Bench Top Can Seamer – Can Your Homebrew!

Updated: 5/21/2024

This review is by Homebrew Finds Contributor Brad Probert.  Brad is an engineer, expert homebrewer and experienced reviewer.  Grab a link to Brad’s website at the end of this review.

Kegland Cannular Can Seamer

It’s been a long road for craft beer to be accepted in cans and not bottles. But it has been well established that cans are OK, too, and some take it even further to tout cans as a superior storage vessel for beer. I’ll avoid a full-blown comparison of the pros & cons of each, but I do feel it worth noting a couple of the selling points cans have. One is the claim that cans provide better storage with a more oxygen-proof seal than bottle caps, and 100% light blocking versus even brown colored glass. There is probably lots of debate on those two topics, but one benefit that is universally recognized is transportability. Cans are lighter and more compact, a whole lot less fragile, and you can take them to beaches and pools where glass containers are banned.

On the homebrew scale, until recently, the canners available have either been hand-crank monstrosities that look like an exhibit from a museum on the industrial revolution, or electrically driven units that look like steampunk movie props and cost a couple thousand dollars. Then in 2019, KegLand from Australia started exporting their Cannular can seamer that sells for $525 for the unit + power supply and is electrically powered. This changed the landscape significantly in the homebrew world, making canning much more within reach.


Rare, Limited Time Deal:

Cannular Bench Top Can Seamer CAN100

  • MoreBeer has Cannular on sale for $399.99. That’s a $150 savings.
  • For some pricing clarity, I’ve seen USED units sell for more than this.
  • This is a rare deal because the regular version of the Cannular is under a MAP agreement.  That means that it, generally speaking, cannot be discounted.  I don’t know if this is a one-off thing or if the reverse roller version will be an ongoing offering.
  • Get Free Shipping: Shipping is also free to most US addresses with a qualifying $59 order.  This includes bulky cases of new cans.
  • Learn More! Hands on Review: Kegland Cannular Bench Top Can Seamer – Homebrew Canner

Cannular Bench Top Can Seamer CAN100


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Empty CanLid on Foam

The Cannular operates with a combination of manual lever pulling and electric motor spinning. You start the process out with an empty aluminum can with no top on it. You sanitize the can, fill it with beer, and then take a sanitized lid and set it down on top of the can (ideally on foam, to ensure minimization of air in your canned product). From there, it gets placed on a small pedestal and a lever turn raises the can up into the machinery of the can seaming operation and locks it at that height. The push of a button gets the motor spinning and the can on its platform starts spinning around. Grabbing a different lever, you push back and hold it for a couple seconds, then pull it toward you for a couple seconds, and you’re done. Turn off the motor, lower your can back down on the pedestal, and you’ve canned one beer.

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Hands on Review: Brew Floors Epoxy Flooring

This review is by Homebrew Finds Contributor Brad Probert.  Brad is an engineer, expert homebrewer and experienced reviewer.  Grab a link to Brad’s website at the end of this review.

Brew Floors Epoxy Flooring

As kids, we build forts out of blankets, pillows, boxes, etc. And the really lucky kids have tree forts in their yards. In the homebrewing world, the tree forts are the dedicated brewing areas in basements, garages, or sheds. And like a good tree fort, you want to customize it to your taste. A good portion of the brew area customization revolves around the practical aspect of brewing beer- good closet or shelf space, custom hooks and gizmos to hang your lengths of tubing to dry, and a source of good brewing tunes. What’s standard in most of the different brewing spaces is poured concrete flooring. Industrial and efficient, but it lacks a certain pizzazz.



Enter Brew Floors. They sell kits for the DIY crowd- whether you’re a professional brewery or a home brewery. Heck, I suppose you probably don’t even have to use it in <gasp> a brewery! It’s an epoxy resin system, meaning it comes as a 2-part liquid that once combined makes a new compound that hardens into a durable, shiny, waterproof layer. They have various level kits from small to large square footage, as well as products that are thicker for use in more industrial areas, available in 4 different colors.

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Hands on Review: StirStarter Stir Plate

This review is by Homebrew Finds Contributor Michael Gom.  Read more about Michael below.

Hands on Review: The StirStarter Yeast Stir Plate

Why make a yeast starter?

A yeast starter can really help insure you have healthy, viable yeast for your beer especially when using liquid yeast. For this reason I always prefer to build up a starter whenever using a liquid yeast (or re-pitching a saved yeast). I won’t get into effectiveness of different starter methods but a popular choice for homebrewers is to use a stir plate, a magnetic stir-bar and a flask of some sort (erlenmeyer flask in most cases).

Full disclosure, I was sent this product for free to do this review. Though I did try and put it through multiple real-world tests and have given my honest opinion on function and performance.


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Also: StirStarter XL 5L Stir Plate – on sale for just $68 – Compare at $80 to $99.99

Also Mentioned in this Review: Cole-Parmer elements AO-34502-65 Cole-Parmer Elements Erlenmeyer Flask| 3 Pack, Magnetic Stir Bar – 50mm / 1.96 Inch


Unboxing and packaging

All the parts and components arrived in a single, compact zip-loc bag.In the bag, an information sheet with info on the company, yeast starters, etc.

Also included is an envelope with an instruction sheet, as well as the “keeper” magnet taped to the back.

As well as the power adapter (in it’s own cardboard box), the stir plate itself, and the stir bar.

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Hands on Review: VineCo Wine Kits!

Updated: 5/15/2024

Thank you to HBF Contributor Aaron Nord for this hands on review!  Aaron is an advanced award winning brewer, a long time reader and a serial tipster!

VineCo Wine Making Kits

First and foremost, it should be known that I am a homebrewer and what follows detail my nascent experience as a hobbyist winemaker. The way I entered the world of homebrewing was by means of a boxed kit (I think it was a Brewer’s Best kit) and a starter equipment kit. Therefore, it felt familiar to me to do the same for this foray into winemaking. Knowing that the box would hopefully contain nearly everything I needed to turn out a tasty beverage (aside from adding my own water and some wine bottles) provided comfort and allayed some concerns I had about being a first-time winemaker.

The VineCo Series wine making kits are available from MoreBeer and come in a myriad of varieties and categories including basic fruited wines (almost in the style of a wine cooler) to premium ones presumably designed for the more refined palate. What’s more, they also tailor them to country or region-specific wines like a Washington Riesling or an Australian Shiraz. My partner and I are fans of red wines and for that reason the California Cabernet Merlot and the Italian Amarone appealed to me. The Amarone style is offered in two different categories from VineCo, the Signature and the Estate. The Signature kit is a little pricier but comes with grape skins, oak cubes, and bottle labels. I chose the Estate kit to keep it simple for my first experience. The California Cabernet Merlot is only offered in the Estate line so that choice was easier.


Make Your Own Wine!

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Hands on Review: Tubby “The Lifetime Glassware” Ultimate Beer Pint

Updated: 4/23/2024

It’s not often that I add to my collection of beer glasses. I’ve been a homebrewer and craft beer lover for a good number of years now and have many opportunities to pick up beer glassware. When I ran across these they looked cool and sported some unique features so I wanted to give them a try.

Hands on Review Tubby The Lifetime Glassware – The Ultimate Beer Pint Glass

Front of the box. It reads… Tubby Two hand-blow 16oz glasses

Back of the box. It reads… While on the journey to find the perfect beer glass, our eureka moment hit us – wider and shorter is better for beer. With a Tubby you can smell your beer like you’re standing next to an ocean of craft brew. You can confidently put down your beer wherever you want since it won’t tip over like those silly tall & skinny pint glasses. Our personal favorite part? The rolled rim for ultra-comfy drinking. We hope the Tubby becomes your favorite glass for every beverage. Let us know what you’re drinking @whatsinyourtubby. Cheers, Same and Craig Founders of Tubby


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Hands on Review: VineCo Winemaking Equipment Kit from MoreBeer!

Thank you to HBF Contributor Aaron Nord for this hands on review!  Aaron is an advanced award winning brewer, a long time reader and a serial tipster!

Winemaking Equipment Starter Kit Review

There are many ways for someone to enter a hobby like beer and winemaking. One of the more common avenues is by way of an equipment starter kit. This is how I made my foray into the world of homebrewing in 2009 and in retrospect I am glad for the experience. Buying an off the shelf kit that had nearly everything I needed was a great place to start since I really didn’t know what I was getting into. It helped me avoid the analysis paralysis that would likely have ensued in trying to figure out what I needed, in what quantity, size or quality all on my own. Thankfully, there were experienced minds who put thought and effort into packaging a collection of gear for the nascent homebrewer to be able to focus on the task of making beer. Let the analysis paralysis come later when the brewer decides to advance in the hobby.

An opportunity arose recently for me to start down a new path with winemaking by way of Winemaking Equipment Starter Kit. Since I had fond memories of a similar kit helping me get started in a hobby that became a passion (and near obsession at times), I was excited for the chance.

This review will cover the contents of the Winemaking Equipment Kit for VineCo Concentrate Kits from MoreBeer which consists of the following items:

  • 7.9 gallon food grade bucket and lid with airlock hole
  • 6 gallon plastic carboy for aging
  • Airlock and stopper
  • 7/16″ Siphon assembly
  • Bottle brush
  • Sample taker/thief
  • Triple scale hydrometer
  • Bottle filler with removable spring
  • Bottle corker
  • 100 Corks – 1 3/4 in.
  • One Step Cleanser

Make Your Own Wine!

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Hands on Review: Blichmann Engineering BrewEasy Compact

This review is by Homebrew Finds Contributor Brad Probert.  Brad is an engineer, expert homebrewer and experienced reviewer.  Grab a link to Brad’s website at the end of this review.

Blichmann Engineering BrewEasy Compact

Blichmann came out with the BrewEasy in 2014. It was when all-in-one units were starting to pop up in the market everywhere. Blichmann went in a different direction, by building on the strength of their existing kettles, and finding an innovative way to connect them together. They came out with a revised model in 2021 that they call the BrewEasy Compact, but they still offer the original configuration and call it the BrewEasy Classic. This review will focus on the BrewEasy Compact.

Bottom of Mash Basket

The BrewEasy Compact is a similar layout to other all-in-one brewing units in the market. There’s a kettle with malt basket that sits inside. When mashing, the grain sits in the basket, and a pump is used to continually recirculate wort through the grain. When mashing is finished, you lift the basket of wet grains out, drain them, and then the kettle changes focus to boiling the wort that is left. The Compact comes in both gas and electric power (120V or 240V). The electric version can come with either the Boil Coil heating element inside the kettle, or Blichmann’s new BoilerMaker Surface with the heating element bonded to the underside of the kettle. The Boilermaker Surface has the same kettle up top, but the heating elements are sealed away in their own space, like a basement apartment. This makes the kettle’s overall height about 6” taller (10-gallon Surface is 22” tall, and standard G2 kettle is 16.4”), but makes the kettle interior very uncluttered for ease of cleaning.


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Hands on Review: Blichmann Engineering BrewEasy Classic

This review is by Homebrew Finds Contributor Brad Probert.  Brad is an engineer, expert homebrewer and experienced reviewer.  Grab a link to Brad’s website at the end of this review.

Blichmann BrewEasy Classic

Blichmann came out with the BrewEasy in 2014. It was when all-in-one units were starting to pop up in the market everywhere. Blichmann went in a different direction, by building on the strength of their existing kettles, and finding an innovative way to connect them together. They came out with a revised model in 2021 that they call the BrewEasy Compact, but they still offer the original configuration and call it the BrewEasy Classic. This review will focus on the BrewEasy Classic.


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Hands On Review: ThermoWorks ChefAlarm Thermometer and Timer

thermoworks chefalarm review

The ChefAlarm Thermometer and Timer Combo from ThermoWorks has some unique features, including the ability to set both high and low temperature alarms.  Other features include: Constant Minimum and Maximum Temperature Displays, User Calibration, Adjustable Alarm Volume, Backlighting and the unit is Splash Proof.  All of this lends itself to making this thermometer and timer combination an amazing tool for homebrewers.


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Hands on Review ChefAlarm + Pro-Series Temperature Probe

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Hands on Review: Delta Brewing Systems Fermtank TC

This review is by Homebrew Finds Contributor Brad Probert.  Brad is an engineer, expert homebrewer and experienced reviewer.  Grab a link to Brad’s website at the end of this review.

Delta Brewing Fermtank TC

Stainless steel is the material of choice for brewing equipment in general. For fermentors, that is especially the case. It is an ideal material for a fermentor because of its cleanability. Stainless is resistant to staining, is durable for scrubbing, and compatible with different cleaners. In contrast to plastic HDPE buckets, stainless can keep oxygen out of your fermenting wort.

Delta Brewing Systems offers a handful of homebrewing products, selling them since 2019. They sell two versions of their Fermtank stainless fermentor. The two have a lot of the same core features, but the recently released Fermtank with Tri-Clamps ups the game in a lot of key areas. The most obvious difference to other fermentors is the 8-gallon size. That size is designed to allow extra volume into the fermentor for those batches where you have a lot of dry hop debris left over (and thus you leave more liquid behind than you normally would). On paper, an 8-gallon fermentor sounds like overkill for a 5-gallon batch, but it’s designed to support all kinds of variations to get you 5 gallons into your serving keg. There are volume markings etched inside, starting at 3 gallons. The optional chilling coil extends down to the 3-gallon level (meaning if you want to chill your wort, you need more than 3 gallons). The thermowell sits at 3.75 gallons.

Main Fermentor Body

TC Clamps, Thermowell, Blanking Plate

Digital Temperature Probe

Etched Volume Markings


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Related: Hands on Review: Delta Brewing Systems Fermtank

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Hands on Review: Brewers Hardware The Dry Hopper!

This review is by Homebrew Finds Contributor Brad Probert.  Brad is an engineer, expert homebrewer and experienced reviewer.  Grab a link to Brad’s website at the end of this review.

Brewers Hardware Dry Hopper

Dry hops. Homebrewers debate their favorite dry hop, how to calculate their IBU contribution, and when is the best time to add dry hops. While many love them, the technical challenge of adding them “right” is a hefty one. Whether you’ve heard of hop creep, or tasted an oxidized IPA, you are interested in minimizing the introduction of oxygen to your beer when you add dry hops.

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Hands on Review: Kegland Hop Bong!

Updated: 6/12/2024

Thank you to HBF Contributor Aaron Nord for this hands on review!  Aaron is an advanced award winning brewer, a long time reader and a serial tipster!

Kegland Hop Bong

Keeping oxygen out of a fermenter after the initial yeast pitch is a goal of most fermentations, with a few exceptions being oxygenating a high gravity batch mid-way through fermentation, barrel-aged ales, or spontaneously fermented ales in open foeders. For a homebrewer who wants to brew a beer outside of those exceptions noted, avoiding oxygen introduction after fermentation has begun is paramount to a quality finished beer, a goal which is sometimes a difficult to attain. Notably, adding dry hops, other flavor components (e.g. wood chips or coffee beans), or clarifying agents (e.g. gelatin fining or Biofine) presents a challenge for most homebrewers if they want to avoid oxygen exposure in the fermenting wort.

There are workarounds and ways for homebrewers to limit oxygen introduction, conceived upon by crafty brewers over the years. Dry hops for example, can be suspended in a muslin bag above the wort by placing a magnet inside the bag and its mating magnet on the outside of the fermenter. In this way, the hops will be in the fermenter at the beginning of fermentation and can be dropped according to the dry hop schedule by simply removing the outside magnet, all without opening the fermenter. Or, to add clarifying agents without cracking the fermenter lid, a brewer can utilize a plastic bottle with a carbonation cap. This method entails adding the liquid substance to a plastic soda bottle and pressurizing the bottle with CO2 via the carbonation cap, purging it, and repeating the process multiple times to ensure the gas inside the bottle is mostly composed of CO2. Then, by using a ball lock jumper, the pressurized bottle can be connected to a fermenter’s ball lock post, if equipped, and the liquid will enter the fermenter, so long as the pressure in the fermenter is less than that of the bottle.

Although these workarounds exist and cut the mustard for my purposes, I was excited when I found out that Kegland was set to release a product that appeared to be a simpler solution all around. In looking into it further I found that it was advertised to have additional uses, aside from the main feature of enabling hop, flavor, or fining additions to the fermenter while limiting oxygen ingress. This highly anticipated product is called the Hop Bong.

I have been a proud owner of a Kegland FermZilla All Rounder fermenterHands on Review – for over two years now and have nothing but good things to say about it. As a manufacturer, Kegland is a homebrewing gear innovator and a leader in the market. They are continuing to come up with novel equipment and tools that span their wide array of product offerings including many for their FermZilla fermenter line. I was excited to see what the Hop Bong could offer as an addition to my All Rounder fermenter.


Kegland Hop Bong Current Price & Availability:

via MoreBeer

via William’s Brewing

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Hands on Review: Nukatap Counter Pressure Bottle Filler!

Thank you to HBF Contributor Aaron Nord for this hands on review!  Aaron is an advanced award winning brewer, a long time reader and a serial tipster!

Nukatap Bottle Filler

As with many homebrewers, my experience with the hobby began with making a boxed kit on my stovetop with about 50 bottles of drinkable beer when all was said and done. It was enough to keep me coming back, advancing in skill and acquiring equipment as time went on. I realized quickly that bottling was my least favorite part and was looking forward to ditching the bottles and getting into kegging. This change was one that made a big impact as far as increasing enjoyment of the hobby for me – that and getting out of stovetop brewing and into an electric brewing setup.

Inevitably, I found myself in the situation where I still needed to fill a few bottles from time to time, mainly for competitions. Now that I was kegging all my beer, I wanted an option that wouldn’t interrupt that practice too much. At the time, the most prevalent options for homebrewers were complicated counterpressure systems or the Blichmann Beer Gun. I opted for the latter and used that for several years to successfully bottle my competition beers. It has its pros and cons (discussed more later), and I always kept my ear to the ground on other options.


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Hands on Review: iSpindel Digital WiFi Hydrometer!

ISPINDLE REVIEW

Thank you to HBF Contributor Aaron Nord for this hands on review!  Aaron is an advanced award winning brewer, a long time reader and a serial tipster!

iSpindel

Having the ability to precisely control fermentation temperatures was the change to my brewing setup I credit with one of the largest improvements in my finished beer quality. Being able to dial in specific temperatures for lagers, perform diacetyl rests for both ales and lagers, and cold crash a finished beer helped me to better control what was happening inside my fermenter. One of the data inputs that informed when to change the fermenter temperature was the gravity of the fermenting wort. At various times through the fermentation, I would test a sample to know where the wort was on its journey to become beer. Taking multiple samples was time consuming and it resulted in a loss, albeit a small loss, of the finished product due to the number of samples I was taking.

Enter the electronic, submersible hydrometer – a tool that can read out not only the gravity of a fermenting liquid, but also its temperature all from inside the fermenter, relieving the need to take numerous samples throughout the fermentation process. In addition, many of these devices could connect to an external source and log the data for the user to read in real-time. The brewer and technologist in me were both excited to see what one of these tools had to offer.

The iSpindel is one of a few offerings to homebrewers today in the category of an electronic, submersible hydrometer which also include the Tilt and Float products (I do have experience with the Tilt, which I will discuss later, but will focus on the iSpindel primarily in this review). All products rely on a sensor that can measure the angle of the device in order to calculate the gravity of the liquid. The iSpindel was born out of a desire to make a more cost-effective version of an electronic tilt measurement-based hydrometer, according to the creator, as the other offerings on the market are typically above the $100 mark.

I purchased my iSpindel on eBay from a seller in Canada for roughly half the price of the other devices available:

https://www.ebay.com/usr/wilbrod45


Also:


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Hands on Review: BN-Link Digital Two Stage Temp Controller – Fermentation & Kegerator

This review is by Homebrew Finds Contributor Brad Probert.  Brad is an engineer, expert homebrewer and experienced reviewer.  Grab a link to Brad’s website at the end of this review.

BN-LINK Controller

BN-LINK Is a relatively new company, with its parent company Century Product Inc being founded in early 2014. The specific brand BN-LINK was created in 2019. And throughout all of this time, they’ve focused on the home electronics market with switches and smart controllers of various types. For homebrewing, there are probably some creative things you could do with some of the smart outlets or timers, but the most direct homebrew-use tool is the temperature controller.

The two-stage outlet controller has two outlets, one for your heating element, one for your cooling element/pump. The power rating is up to 1875W, which is a higher rating than even most All-In-One brewing units. The functional temperature range of the controller is from -40F to 176F, so you might be able to use it for heating strike water or for mash control, but it definitely shines for fermentation control. It has adjustable resolution, so you can set your target temperature in either full degree increments or 0.1 degree increments. It comes with a temperature probe with a nearly 6-ft long cable (71 inches). The probe is waterproof, but the controller is not, so make sure you keep distance between your probe and the controller. The display shows you both the current temperature and the target temperature you have set.

Controller and Probe

With two outlets, you plug in both your heating and cooling device at the same time. You set your target temperature and then a Cooling Differential value, which just says how warm above your target temperature before it kicks on the cooling device. Likewise, there’s a Heating Differential value, and you decide how cold you’ll let the probe measure before kicking on the heating device. The controller also has a programmable alarm you can set to alert you if it gets too hot, or too cold. There’s an overload reset switch in case you accidentally send too much current through it- designed to trip the switch instead of burn out the circuit board. And the last bit of functionality is a compressor delay, which sets a minimum amount of time for the compressor to be off before it switches on again, to protect the compressor of your cooling device from switching on & off too frequently and damaging it.


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Hands on Review: Blichmann Engineering BrewVision Thermometer!

blichmann engineering brewvision review

This review is by Homebrew Finds Contributor Brad Probert.  Brad is an engineer, expert homebrewer and experienced reviewer.  Grab a link to Brad’s website at the end of this review.

Blichmann BrewVision Thermometer

There is a wide array of homebrew gear out there. Most anything you buy has options or comes in various designs. Specific to this review, there are tons of different thermometers. But one of Blichmann’s offerings sets itself apart by coupling some very useful software with its digital thermometer. The BrewVision has been on the market for 5-6 years, but just recently they lowered the price substantially, making it even lower than their analog dial-gauge thermometer.

The BrewVision comes in two configurations based on the length of the temperature probe you need in your particular setup. It has a standard ½” NPT thread to screw into a female NPT fitting, paired with their weldless bulkhead fitting, or coupled with their TC mounting flange. The package contains the probe and the threaded installation collar, and a large sealed transmitter housing that contains 2x AAA batteries, the on/off button, and the Bluetooth transmitting hardware.

The power of the BrewVision lies in the software interface you install on your phone. It doesn’t require the latest smartphone (compatible with even the 2010 iPhone 4, or any Android phones) to run their software. You can run the software with whatever level of sophistication you want. At its simplest, your phone functions as the pressure readout gauge. There is no display on the body of the BrewVision itself, so it requires you to have your Bluetooth smartphone paired and running the Blichmann app. While this might seem like a hassle to some, the benefit is you no longer have to be right next to your thermometer to know the temperature, you just have to be in Bluetooth range. Stay in your comfy chair relaxing while your strike water heats, or dodge the winter weather during your mash while you sit inside with the heat on.


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Hands on Review: Kegland Hang Tab Keg Lids – works on ball lock & pin lock kegs

Kegland, based in Australia, produces a broad array of homebrewing gear. fermenters, electric brewing systems, loads of draft stuff (including DuoTight!) and lots more.

It’s obvious these folks are homebrewers at heart, because they’ve come up some really innovative stuff. The other thing they’ve generally done is hit really good price points. There is a balance between cost, features and quality and they seem to be hitting a lot of bullseyes.

This is a hands on look at their unique keg lid with integrated hang tag model KL02868.

Close of up of the lid. Reads… Caution Release Pressure to Remove Lid. Maximum Working Pressure 130 PSI.


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