Category Archives: Kegland

Kegland Ball Lock Kegs – on sale for $89.99! at William’s Brewing… BEATS Black Friday 2023 + Hands on Review

5 Gallon NSF KegLand Keg from William’s Brewing

More Info

From the product description, check product page for current description, price and availability:

Our new NSF certified stainless steel five gallon kegs from Keg Land have two ball-lock male quick disconnect fittings that hold pressure even when not connected, allowing you to have several kegs aging while one is tapped. Also referred to as Corny Kegs or Soda Kegs. Precisely made with smooth robotically welded interior welds for ease of cleaning to stringent NSF standards. Made in China.

Features a 3 by 3.5″ oval lid for easy cleaning, and a pressure relief lid mounted valve for safety. An exclusive stainless hang tap is welded onto the inside of the lid to make it easier for you to suspend dry hopping bags and hop infusers. 25″ tall, and 8½” wide. These require 26″ of headspace once you connect ball lock fittings and hoses. Rubber bumpers on top and bottom protect this keg from damage.


 

5 Gallon NSF KegLand Keg

Check sale or product page for current availability & pricing

Save via Father’s Day Sale!

william's brewing father's day sale

William’s Brewing Annual Father’s Day Sale is on! Valid for a limited time, while supplies last.

Shipping is free or reasonably priced flat rate to addresses in the contiguous US depending on your order size for most items.

William’s Brewing Father’s Day Sale

  • As of this posting these are included in the mix and on sale for just $89.99.
  • For some pricing clarity, according to my records, this deal handily BEATS William’s Black Friday 2023 deal on these kegs. At that time these were on sale for $104.99. I don’t recall or have it documented, but I’m guessing the list price was also more at that time.

Learn More!  Hands on Review: Kegland Ball Lock Kegs!

keg deals

Also: Kegerator Tips & Gear | Keg Repair Part #s | Recent Keg Finds

Our Top Draft Resources

This post may contain affiliate links. We may make a commission when you use our links. This will never cost you extra. Thank you for supporting Homebrew Finds!

Visit William’s Brewing – Web Only Clearance Sale

Price, promotions and availability can change quickly. Check the product page for current price, description and availability.

Last Call, Ends Tonight… Kegland Hop Bong on sale at William’s Brewing! (sold out at MoreBeer)

kegland fermzilla hop bong

Named purely on its looks and not its function. The Hop Bong is a versatile pressurizable tri-clamp accessory, capable of not only dry hopping oxygen purged hops into fermenters, but also as an inline carbonation/oxygenation accessory.

This is a completely new pressure pack for the basic FermZilla Tri-Conical and All Rounder Fermenters with the new 2″ Tri-Clover Adapted Pressure Lid.

Hop Bong Upgrade for Fermzilla

Learn More! Hands on Review: Kegland Hop Bong

via William’s Brewing

via MoreBeer

FermZilla Reviews!

MORE MoreBeer Deals!…This post contains affiliate links. We may make a commission when you use our links. This will never cost you extra. Thank you for supporting Homebrew Finds!

Price, promotions and availability can change quickly. Check the product page for current price, description and availability.

Kegland Ball Lock Kegs – on sale at William’s… BEATS Black Friday 2023

5 Gallon NSF KegLand Keg from William’s Brewing

More Info

From the product description, check product page for current description, price and availability:

Our new NSF certified stainless steel five gallon kegs from Keg Land have two ball-lock male quick disconnect fittings that hold pressure even when not connected, allowing you to have several kegs aging while one is tapped. Also referred to as Corny Kegs or Soda Kegs. Precisely made with smooth robotically welded interior welds for ease of cleaning to stringent NSF standards. Made in China.

Features a 3 by 3.5″ oval lid for easy cleaning, and a pressure relief lid mounted valve for safety. An exclusive stainless hang tap is welded onto the inside of the lid to make it easier for you to suspend dry hopping bags and hop infusers. 25″ tall, and 8½” wide. These require 26″ of headspace once you connect ball lock fittings and hoses. Rubber bumpers on top and bottom protect this keg from damage.


 

5 Gallon NSF KegLand Keg

Check sale or product page for current availability & pricing

Save via Father’s Day Sale!

william's brewing father's day sale

William’s Brewing Annual Father’s Day Sale is on! Valid for a limited time, while supplies last.

Shipping is free or reasonably priced flat rate to addresses in the contiguous US depending on your order size for most items.

William’s Brewing Father’s Day Sale

  • As of this posting these are included in the mix and on sale for just $89.99.
  • For some pricing clarity, according to my records, this deal handily BEATS William’s Black Friday 2023 deal on these kegs. At that time these were on sale for $104.99. I don’t recall or have it documented, but I’m guessing the list price was also more at that time.

Continue reading

BEATS Black Friday 2023… Kegland Ball Lock Kegs – on sale for $89.99! at William’s Brewing + Hands on Review

5 Gallon NSF KegLand Keg from William’s Brewing

More Info

From the product description, check product page for current description, price and availability:

Our new NSF certified stainless steel five gallon kegs from Keg Land have two ball-lock male quick disconnect fittings that hold pressure even when not connected, allowing you to have several kegs aging while one is tapped. Also referred to as Corny Kegs or Soda Kegs. Precisely made with smooth robotically welded interior welds for ease of cleaning to stringent NSF standards. Made in China.

Features a 3 by 3.5″ oval lid for easy cleaning, and a pressure relief lid mounted valve for safety. An exclusive stainless hang tap is welded onto the inside of the lid to make it easier for you to suspend dry hopping bags and hop infusers. 25″ tall, and 8½” wide. These require 26″ of headspace once you connect ball lock fittings and hoses. Rubber bumpers on top and bottom protect this keg from damage.


 

5 Gallon NSF KegLand Keg

Check sale or product page for current availability & pricing

Save via Father’s Day Sale!

william's brewing father's day sale

William’s Brewing Annual Father’s Day Sale is on! Valid for a limited time, while supplies last.

Shipping is free or reasonably priced flat rate to addresses in the contiguous US depending on your order size for most items.

William’s Brewing Father’s Day Sale

  • As of this posting these are included in the mix and on sale for just $89.99.
  • For some pricing clarity, according to my records, this deal handily BEATS William’s Black Friday 2023 deal on these kegs. At that time these were on sale for $104.99. I don’t recall or have it documented, but I’m guessing the list price was also more at that time.

Learn More!  Hands on Review: Kegland Ball Lock Kegs!

keg deals

Also: Kegerator Tips & Gear | Keg Repair Part #s | Recent Keg Finds

Our Top Draft Resources

This post may contain affiliate links. We may make a commission when you use our links. This will never cost you extra. Thank you for supporting Homebrew Finds!

Visit William’s Brewing – Web Only Clearance Sale

Price, promotions and availability can change quickly. Check the product page for current price, description and availability.

Hands on Review: NukaTap FLOW CONTROL Faucets

This review is by Homebrew Finds Contributor Brad Probert.  Brad is an engineer, expert homebrewer and experienced reviewer.  Grab a link to Brad’s website at the end of this review.

Updated: 5/30/2024


Announcing: KegLand Nukatap Gen 2 Flow Control Faucets!

NukaTap® Stainless Steel Beer Faucet | Flow Control Gen 2 | Forward Sealing

NukaTap® Stainless Steel Beer Faucet | Flow Control Gen 2 | Forward Sealing

More Info

From the product description, check product page for current description, price and availability:

  • G2 model features redesigned flow control mechanism for improved shank sealing and flow control
  • Make instant adjustments to beverage flow as you pour
  • Switch from pouring pints to filling growlers without adjusting your CO2 regulator
  • Reduced first pour foam due to low thermal mass
  • Forward-sealing design prevents beer residue from gumming up the faucet
  • Unique shuttle design greatly improves laminar flow, improving the pour of carbonated beverages
  • Compatible with all Intertap faucet accessories and shanks

Generation 2
The NukaTap Flow Control G2 uses a completely new flow control mechanism with better sealing properties against the shank as well as improved flow control.

Control the Flow
The flow control model is a great option for users that often switch between beer styles with different carbonation levels. No need to rebalance your lines or play with your regulator settings. Instantly make adjustments as you pour to dial in the flow rate. This is also a super convenient feature for when you want to grab a quick growler on your way out. By dialing back the flow rate, you can gently fill your growler so CO2 stays in solution and your beer doesn’t pour flat when it comes time to share. The NukaTap Flow Control faucet is also the first FC model to be fully compatible with the optional self-closing spring.

First Pour Foam Reduction
Every kegerator owner knows the letdown of pouring your first pint of the day and getting too much foam. Even with perfectly balanced draft lines, first pour foam is sometimes unavoidable simply due to the temperature of the faucet itself. Running beer through the faucet will drop the temperature, and the foaming will subside, but not without a bit of wasted beer from pouring off excess head. The NukaTap beer faucet drops to beer serving temperature much faster thanks to its lower thermal mass. Simply put, the bulkier the faucet is, the more beer is needed to flow through and chill the tap. The NukaTap is over 20% lighter than its Intertap predecessor, and even lighter still compared to other brands of faucets.

Improved Laminar Flow
The inspiration for the NukaTap name comes from its uniquely designed “nuke-shaped” shuttle that resides on the inside of the faucet. The NukaShuttle went through numerous rounds of redesigns and countless hours of testing to find a shape that provides superior laminar flow. This means that liquid passes by the shuttle with very little resistance, allowing highly carbonated beers or hard seltzers to pour like a dream.

Sanitary Design
The NukaShuttle is the world’s first seamless single-piece design. Traditional taps feature an o-ring seated on a stainless steel shuttle, which can cause a couple of issues. After many pours, the stainless shuttle rubbing against the internal body of the faucet will create small fissures that become potential infection sites, and the seated o-ring can be difficult to clean in place, making your draft cleaning and sanitizing process less effective than you realize. The NukaShuttle is an advanced TPV rubber matrix that has been seamlessly formed over a durable PP skeleton. This single-piece design eliminates the pitfalls of older manufacturing methods, making it one of the most sanitary faucets on the market.

Forward Sealing vs. Rear Sealing
From tap rooms to home bars, forward-sealing faucets are the ideal choice for any draft setup. In traditional rear-sealing taps, beer will drain out of the entire faucet when it’s in the closed position. This means the internal mechanism is coated in beer, which then dries and becomes a sticky residue. Forward-sealing faucets, on the other hand, keep the tap full of beer so it never has a chance to dry and gunk up the internal parts. This makes the faucet much easier to clean and also reduces the chance of off flavors transferring to your beer while you pour.

  • Made from stainless steel
  • Shuttle made from TPV
  • O-rings made from EPDM

Kegland Part Number: KL15523


 

Flow control faucets feature a built in flow compensator that allows you to adjust the resistance your faucet is exerting.  That means less tubing and potentially less foaming and wasted beer. The compensation feature also makes it easier to serve higher carbonation beers as you can set the faucet to provide resistance to offset the increased pressure needed to store and serve these beers at higher pressures.  Instead of replacing your beer line with ever increasing lengths of tubing, you simply turn a knob to increase resistance.

NukaTap® Stainless Steel Beer Faucet | Flow Control Gen 2 | Forward Sealing


Nukatap Flow Control Keg Faucet

There are a wide variety of options for how to take your kegged homebrew with you to a party or meet up with friends. There is a big draw to kegging your homebrew because of how it simplifies the process of serving your beer after it’s finished in the fermentor. But it’s obviously less portable than individual bottles. There are mini keg/growlers you can fill from the tap, or bottle fillers that you can connect right to your tap. But these options all come with the extra step of cleaning and filling additional “stuff”. Being able to serve directly from the keg has advantages from that perspective.

Flow Control Faucet Disassembled

The most common option of serving from the keg is the picnic tap/cobra tap attached to a length of beer tubing. The downside of cobra taps is their propensity to fail, or propensity of your partygoers to not know what they’re doing and end up spilling/wasting a lot of beer. A jockey box is great for a bigger event where you’re going to be pouring a lot of beer over a longer period of time. But these are expensive, big/bulky to haul around, and makes another thing that has an involved cleaning process afterwards.

There have been ball lock keg faucets out on the market for some time. But unless you’re using these on a growler with a restrictive dip tube in it, these aren’t very practical. Putting a regular faucet on a keg gives you a cup of mostly foam unless you take special care to nearly de-carb your beer first (and who likes flat beer?). For these to work properly when directly attached to a keg, you need a flow control faucet. Kegland’s ball lock shankReview – has the same interface as a regular keg shank like you have on your keezer, so they just mate this to their regular Nukatap. Then you can serve directly from the keg, and it’s not a big piece of gear to haul around with you or clean up later.


Check Current Pricing and Availability, Review Continues Below:

NukaTap Faucets come in three variations. Stainless, Stealth (Matte Black) and Flow Control. All feature stainless steel construction, forward seal design and all the other NukaTap innovations.

I’m also linking to Intertap faucets and accessories where applicable because all Intertap spouts work with NukaTap

Continue reading

Kegland Ball Lock Kegs – NSF Certified, Unique Hang Tab Design Lids – on sale for $87.99! at William’s Brewing + Hands on Review

5 Gallon NSF KegLand Keg from William’s Brewing

More Info

From the product description, check product page for current description, price and availability:

Our new NSF certified stainless steel five gallon kegs from Keg Land have two ball-lock male quick disconnect fittings that hold pressure even when not connected, allowing you to have several kegs aging while one is tapped. Also referred to as Corny Kegs or Soda Kegs. Precisely made with smooth robotically welded interior welds for ease of cleaning to stringent NSF standards. Made in China.

Features a 3 by 3.5″ oval lid for easy cleaning, and a pressure relief lid mounted valve for safety. An exclusive stainless hang tap is welded onto the inside of the lid to make it easier for you to suspend dry hopping bags and hop infusers. 25″ tall, and 8½” wide. These require 26″ of headspace once you connect ball lock fittings and hoses. Rubber bumpers on top and bottom protect this keg from damage.


 

  • As of this posting William’s Brewing has these on sale for just $87.99.
  • These are great kegs! Check out my Hands on Review
  • Shipping is free or reasonably priced flat rate to addresses in the contiguous US depending on your order size for most items.

5 Gallon NSF KegLand Keg

Learn More!  Hands on Review: Kegland Ball Lock Kegs!

keg deals

Also: Kegerator Tips & Gear | Keg Repair Part #s | Recent Keg Finds

Our Top Draft Resources

This post may contain affiliate links. We may make a commission when you use our links. This will never cost you extra. Thank you for supporting Homebrew Finds!

Visit William’s Brewing – Web Only Clearance Sale

Price, promotions and availability can change quickly. Check the product page for current price, description and availability.

Beverage Doctor – Waterproof pH Meter via MoreBeer – on sale for $43.99, BEATS 2019 Deal

Beverage Doctor - Pen Style PH Meter MT624

Beverage Doctor – Pen Style PH Meter from MoreBeer

More Info

From the product description, check product page for current description, price and availability:

Looking for an easy to use pH meter at a great price? The Beverage Doctor is here to help you get your mashes to the perfect pH.

The Beverage Doctor will get you a very accurate reading with its 0.01 pH resolution. The calibration process couldn’t be easier to perform, just place the probe in the buffer solution closest to pH of the sample you’ll be testing and press the button! This pH meter also includes ATC (Automatic Temperature Control) so you don’t have to get your sample all the way down to room temperature before you take your reading.

The Beverage Doctor features a replaceable probe in case yours is lost or damaged. Homebrewing can be a tough environment for your pH probe so we feel you shouldn’t have to buy a whole new pH meter everytime your probe breaks. The cap that holds the probe storage solution has a very tight seal and should prevent your probe from drying out while not in use. Don’t worry about getting this meter wet either, because the entire unit is waterproof!

  • Replaceable probe
  • ATC (Automatic Temperature Control)
  • Waterproof
  • Accurate to 0.01 pH
  • Easy 3 point calibration
  • LR44/AG13 batteries included

 

Beverage Doctor – Pen Style PH Meter MT624

Check sale or product page for current availability & pricing

Limited Time Deal via Father’s Day Sale

MoreBeer has a huge Dads and Grads sale going on. Save on kegerators, kegs, kits and lots more.

Dad’s & Grads Sale!

This pH meter is included in the mix and on sale for just $43.99.

From the “prices on everything continue to skyrocket” department, this BEATS a deal of the day that was offered in September of 2019. At that time it was offered for $44.99. The lowest historical price I have recorded for this $39.99 back in July of 2019.

deals on sacks of malt

MORE MoreBeer Deals!…This post contains affiliate links. We may make a commission when you use our links. This will never cost you extra. Thank you for supporting Homebrew Finds!

Price, promotions and availability can change quickly. Check the product page for current price, description and availability. tag:b3peroff

Kegland FermZilla All Rounder Sale at MoreBeer! + Hands on Review

kegland fermzilla all rounder

  • MoreBeer has introduced Kegland’s lineup of FermZilla All Rounder Fermenters and Accessories.  This adds to an already strong lineup of FermZilla fermenters.
  • As of this posting both 7.9 and 15.9 gallon options are available.  The 7.9 gallon fermenter is available for pre-order while the 15.9 gallon appears to be ready to ship.
  • Harness and Stainless Handle Accessories are also available.
  • Get Free Shipping: This ships for free with a qualify order as part of MoreBeer’s Free Shipping Program.  Under that promo most orders over $59 ship for free.
  • Easy Filler Item….  If you’re looking for a filler item to help you qualify for free shipping, consider grabbing some PBW

FermZilla All Rounder Fermenters and AccessoriesComplete FermZilla Lineup

Check sale or product page for current availability & pricing

For a limited time MoreBeer has most variations of All Rounder on sale as part of their Dad’s & Grads Sale!

Learn More!  Our Hands on Review!

Hands on Review: FermZilla All Rounder Fermenter

More Fermentation Related!

MORE MoreBeer Deals!…This post contains affiliate links. We may make a commission when you use our links. This will never cost you extra. Thank you for supporting Homebrew Finds!

Price, promotions and availability can change quickly. Check the product page for current price, description and availability. 6.3.20  tag:watchan Announcing: Kegland FermZilla All Rounder Fermenters and Accessories

Kegland Polycarbonate Sight Glass, 2 Piece Set – $10.49 + free ship eligible, limited availability, matches 2022 deal

Polycarbonate Sight Glass - 2 Piece Set

Kegland Polycarbonate Sight Glass – 23.5 in from MoreBeer

More Info

From the product description, check product page for current description, price and availability:

Made from polycarbonate, these simple sight gauges are easy to install and clean. It comes with a 1/2 in BSP threaded post featuring a barb with o-rings and a 23.5 in polycarbonate tube that can be cut down to size.

Note: The tube may require a hose clamp to keep it fixed to the barb.

Kegland Part Number: KL03742


 

With some Teflon tape, for homebrew use, BSP is generally compatible with MPT..

Limited Availability Deal of the Day: As of this posting, this on sale as as a MoreBeer Deal of the DayShipping is also free to addresses in the contiguous US with most $59 Orders. Availability: This is available today only, while supplies last. Quantities are limited. Check the MoreBeer’s Deal of the Day to check today’s offering.

Product Description – Here – Use coupon code BEERDEAL to get this discount.

Polycarbonate Sight Glass – 23.5 in. MT521

From the “prices on everything continue to skyrocket” department, this matches a deal of the day that was offered in March of 2022.

Kegland Gear Reviews!

MORE MoreBeer Deals!…This post contains affiliate links. We may make a commission when you use our links. This will never cost you extra. Thank you for supporting Homebrew Finds!

Hands on Review: Kegland Ball Lock Keg

Updated: 5/16/2024

Kegland, based in Australia, produces a broad array of homebrewing gear. fermenters, electric brewing systems, loads of draft stuff (including DuoTight!) and lots more.

It’s obvious these folks are homebrewers at heart, because they’ve come up some really innovative stuff. The other thing they’ve generally done is hit really good price points. There is a balance between cost, features and quality and they seem to be hitting a lot of bullseyes.

This is an in depth hands on look at Kegland’s 5 gallon ball lock keg.

Hands on Review Kegland 5 Gallon Ball Lock Keg

A look at the boxThe other side of the box. This is one of the better looking keg boxes I’ve run across.


Check Current Prices, Models and Availability:


This article contains affiliate links. We may make a small percentage if you use our links to make a purchase. You won’t pay more and you’ll be supporting Homebrew Finds and more content like this. Thank you for your support!


Continue reading

Hands on Review: Kegland Ball Lock Keg

Updated: 5/16/2024

Kegland, based in Australia, produces a broad array of homebrewing gear. fermenters, electric brewing systems, loads of draft stuff (including DuoTight!) and lots more.

It’s obvious these folks are homebrewers at heart, because they’ve come up some really innovative stuff. The other thing they’ve generally done is hit really good price points. There is a balance between cost, features and quality and they seem to be hitting a lot of bullseyes.

This is an in depth hands on look at Kegland’s 5 gallon ball lock keg.

Hands on Review Kegland 5 Gallon Ball Lock Keg

A look at the boxThe other side of the box. This is one of the better looking keg boxes I’ve run across.


Check Current Prices, Models and Availability:


This article contains affiliate links. We may make a small percentage if you use our links to make a purchase. You won’t pay more and you’ll be supporting Homebrew Finds and more content like this. Thank you for your support!


Continue reading

BrewZilla Gen 4 on Sale at William’s Brewing + In Depth Hands on Review

Brewzilla 35 Liter Gen 4 110 volt

Brewzilla 35 Liter Gen 4 via William’s Brewing

More Info

From the product description, check product page for current description, price and availability:

The Brewzilla Gen 4 features a RAPT compatible controller, which means you can track, record, and monitor your beers online through the RAPT portal at https://app.rapt.io. It SHIPS FREE to lower 48.

• Recirculation Pump

• Mash & Boil, and Chill

• Mash up to 20 pounds

• Distilling Options

• Free Wort Chiller Tubing Connection Kit Included

• Runs on 110 volts, plugs in anywhere

New Detachable RAPT WIFI Controller

The RAPT portal has many features: you can see a record of your previous brews, remotely control the unit and turn it on to preheat from your phone, alter temperature settings from your phone, and more. Custom mash temperature profiles can be created and stored, alarms can be set if you want it to remind you when to add hop stages, or tell you when the strike water is heated and it is time to mash. All functions go through the RAPT controller; there are no longer toggle switches to control things like wattage and the pump.

New Concave Draining Base

The new base is dished towards the center so it drains all the wort. No need to tilt the unit to extract every drop of wort.

Larger Capacity Malt Pipe with Two Positions

The new high flow malt pipe is 20% larger than the old, meaning the 35 Liter Brewzilla can now mash up to 20 pounds of crushed malt per batch. This is great for high gravity beers, and enabled by the new concave base drain, which gave the designers more room for a malt pipe. The malt pipe also now has two positions, so you can lift it halfway up and twist for smaller batches, or lift it all the way like before for full batches. This is the latest version, with side perforations in addition to bottom of the basket perforations.

Easy Access Pump

The bottom cover has been reduced in size to only house the sensitive electrical components. This leave the pump easily accessible in case you need to clear a clog or replace a drain hose.

The Gen 4 Brewzilla with Pump from KegLand features a recirculation pump, as well as a false bottom and grain pipe to both protect the pump from clogging, and hold the crushed grain above the bottom for good wort circulation. The Unit holds 9 gallons, although we do not recommend boiling more than 6½ gallons (perfect for 5-6 gallon batches). The grain pipe (basket) holds up to 20 pounds of crushed malt, and a pipe with included silicone hose on top feeds the recirculated wort from the pump evenly on top of the grain bed. Runs on any GFCI protected 110 volt plug with at least 15 amps. Includes a free Chiller Tubing Connection Kit with 15’ of tubing. Dimensions: 12” by 12” by 25” with the grain pipe removed.


 

  • For a short time William’s Brewing has this on for $549.99
  • Shipping is free or reasonably priced flat rate to addresses in the contiguous US depending on your order size for most items.

Brewzilla 35 Liter Gen 4 110 volt

Hands on Review: BrewZilla Gen 4 All Grain Brewing System

This post may contain affiliate links. We may make a commission when you use our links. This will never cost you extra. Thank you for supporting Homebrew Finds!

Visit William’s Brewing – Web Only Clearance Sale

Price, promotions and availability can change quickly. Check the product page for current price, description and availability.

KegLand Series X Kegerator – on sale for $679.99 + free delivery

KegLand Series X.1 Kegerator

KegLand Series X.1 Kegerator

More Info

From the product description, check product page for current description, price and availability:

The new  stainless series X.1 improves on the KegLand Series X Kegerator:

• 10% more power efficient

• 15% faster cooling and better cooling in climates as hot as 90° F.

• Thicker walls for improved insulation

• New LED door activated interior light

• Premium Stainless Steel Top / Side Panels

• 20″ long stainless drip tray accomodates all towers including the 4 Faucet T Tower

And of course it has all the features that made the original Series X Kegerator great:

• Wide 26° to 82° F Range

• Holds four Cornelius style homebrew kegs (8½” diameter)

• Holds three 1/6 Barrel Commercial Sankey Kegs (9 3/16″ diameter)

• Latest Nukatap Faucets with all tower options

• Easy to connect Duotight fittings as well as EvaBarrier beer & gas tubing included with all towers

• Tower Cooling Fan with front panel switch

• Converts to a Fermentation Chamber and includes a removeable wire shelf

• Includes item Q62 C02 Regulator with EvaBarrier compatible outlet

• Includes item Z46 5 pound C02 cylinder holder that mounts on the back of the unit if desired

• 4 Caster wheels (2 front locking, and 2 rear free spinning), or use the included adjustable legs

• One Year Warranty (and we stock all vital spare parts in case you need them after the warranty period)

Cold does not rise. You will find that a beer tower elevated above a refrigerator will always remain warmer than the refrigerator, resulting in initial pours from the kegerator that are warm and foamy, followed by colder pours once you have dispensed a beer or two. At home this is a real problem, unless you pour beers in quick succession. A tower cooling fan is standard equipment, with a fan on/off switch on the front digital control panel.

The beauty of the KegLand Series X.1 is the extended range thermostat included. Unlike kegerators with standard 30° to 50° temperature ranges, the Series X.1 can be adjusted easily with the front panel digital display from 26° to 82° F (ambient temperature permitting), which means you can also use your kegerator as a fermentation chamber for ales in summer, a small refrigerator for food items, or even a wine cellar. A removeable wire shelf is included in case you want to do this.  Keep in mind the unit only cools, and does not heat, and a temperature of say 65 degrees F. is only possible if the temperature outside the kegerator is 65 degrees or warmer.

The all stainless drip tray rests on top of the unit, and can be removed for easy cleaning. This simple two piece design cleans up quick in your sink, and eliminates the need to clean a sticky drip tray on the unit. It is 20″ long, long enough for all tower options including the 4 faucet T tower.

Included with all models are a a C02 bottle mounting bracket, our item Q62 Gas Regulator, and integral tower cooling fan.  You will need to provide a flat bottom 5 pound C02 cylinder (available at welding supply stores and fire extingisher service firms). You select the beer tower/faucet option that is right for you, or order the base unit without a tower if you already have one.

Setup is easy with Duotight connections included for everything from the faucet shanks to the optional regulator. These make it easy to connect and disconnect gas and beer lines, and eliminate the need for hose clamps. As noted below, you will need additional parts depending on how many faucets you get, and if you want to dispense home brew ball lock kegs ora commercial sanke kegs.

Please note: These all stainless units may arrive with very small cosmetic blemishes, scratches or dents incured during manufacturing and shipping which are unavoidable.  Unfortunately, we cannot guarantee that your unit will not have any of the above mentioned blemishes. We  guarantee the cooling performance of the unit, and will repair or replace any unit at our discretion if it is damaged during shipping.

Important Installation Note: Series X.1 kegerators need 4″ of clearance on both sides and the back of the unit when installing so they do not overheat. This model cannot be installed flush into a countertop with no side clearance like a dishwasher. The side walls have radiators inside that dissipate heat, and they cannot be blocked. These are designed for indoor use, and a maximum ambient temperature of 90° F. or less.

Note: The Four Faucet Tower options should only be considered if you are dispensing home brew kegs, as this unit only holds three five gallon sankey commercial kegs.

Dimensions:

24″ wide

27″ deep, 32″ with C02 Bottle Mounted on back

33.5″ tall (just the box, no drip tray, caster wheels, tower, or chrome guard rail)

35″ tall (with caster wheels but no drip tray, tower, or chrome guard rail)

52″ tall with caster wheels and tower

Internal Dimensions:

19.4″ wide

16″ deep

28.25″ tall

Power Consumption:

85 watts, 1.6 amps, runs on 110 volts.

How many kegs will fit?

Homebrew:

5 Gallon 8½” diameter Ball Lock or Pin Lock  Cornelius Keg – 4 ( or 2 Ball Lock and one 1/6 barrel Sankey keg)

2.5 Gallon 8½” diameter Cornelius Keg – 4

5 Gallon 9¼” diameter Cornelius Ball or Pin Lock Keg – 3

Commercial Kegs:

5.16 Gallon Sixth Barrel – 3

7¾ Gallon any type – 1

15½ Gallon – 1

Fermenters:

1 30 Liter All Rounder item V12

1 6 Gallon Siphonless Fermenter item E07


 

  • For a limtied time William’s Brewing has this on sale for just $679.99.
  • Delivery is also free to addresses in the contiguous US

KegLand Series X Kegerator

keg deals

This post may contain affiliate links. We may make a commission when you use our links. This will never cost you extra. Thank you for supporting Homebrew Finds!

Visit William’s Brewing – Web Only Clearance Sale

Price, promotions and availability can change quickly. Check the product page for current price, description and availability tag:watchan Introducing: KegLand Series X Plus Kegerator – Holds 8 Kegs! 2.5.22 

Hands on Review: BrewZilla Gen 4 + Limited Time DEAL on 100 Liter Ends Today

Updated: 5/23/2024

This review is by Homebrew Finds Contributor Brad Probert.  Brad is an engineer, expert homebrewer and experienced reviewer.  Grab a link to Brad’s website at the end of this review.


Limited Time Deal

William’s Brewing has select sizes of BrewZilla on sale for a limited time


Hands on Review BrewZilla Gen4

I’ve brewed on several different all-in-one units. Like any brew system, they each have their own strengths and weaknesses. I did a hands-on review of the Robobrew when it first came out in late 2016. It has since changed its name to BrewZilla and is on the 4th generation of the brew unit. As you’d expect with repeated generations, they’ve been able to focus on fixing deficiencies in their previous models and also introduce new features.

The basic premise of an all-in-one brewing system is that your mash and boil kettle are in the

same vessel. So just like Brew In A Bag, after mashing, you pull the grains out and the wort stays behind to be boiled. They use electricity for heat, so they can be used outdoors where you can reach power or indoors where you have a venting system that can take care of all the steam you make during your boil.

BrewZilla Without Jacket

Stamped Volume Markings

Here are some basic stats on the Gen4 BrewZilla. It’s available in a 35-Liter form (for 5-6 gallon batches) with either a 110V setup, or 220V. There is also a larger 65-Liter that is only 220V (targeted to 10-12 gallon batches). The 35L unit holds 9.25 gallons, the mash basket can hold up to 23.5 lbs. of grain, and its electric heating elements can output up to 1500W of power (110V system) or 2400W of power (220V system). The 65L unit holds 17.1 gallons, the mash basket holds 41.5 lbs. of grain, and 3500W of heating power. All the Gen4 units have a pump bolted into the base. The pump can be used not only for wort recirculation during the mash, but also to pump beer through your wort chiller apparatus (should you choose to not use the immersion chiller coil included with the BrewZilla). The pump is more modular and accessible than previous Gen models. To protect the pump from clogging with hop debris during the boil or whirlpool, there is a filter screen (a perforated stainless disc that sits at the bottom of the unit) that sits at the bottom of the kettle. The small magnetic drive pump has a pump head rating of 1.5 – 2.1 m (4.9 – 6.9 ft) and a max flow rate of 11-12 L/min (2.9 – 3.2 gal/min).

Control Panel Notification During Mash Profile

One of the key upgraded features of the Gen4 BrewZilla is the controller. RAPT Is Kegland’s line of wireless connected brewing devices. The BrewZilla now has a RAPT controller so it adds a lot of features that can be monitored and controlled over Wi-Fi. This includes basic things like monitoring temperature from your laptop/cell phone, but also allows you to program complex mash programs online and then download to your BrewZilla. You can also adjust control parameters on the fly such as pump output duty cycle and heater output level. If you get the optional Bluetooth thermometer, you can stick the temperature probe into the middle of your grain bed, and then have the controller use that as its control signal in combination with the built-in temperature sensor that sits on the floor of the unit.

Bluetooth Temp Probe in Middle of Mash

Although All-in-One units are essentially BIAB, they use a stainless steel basket with holes in the bottom of it instead of a bag, and call it a “malt pipe”. These provide functional improvements over a nylon bag. The obvious one is they are way easier to clean. But they also allow you to ensure you get full flow through your grain bed by having holes only on the bottom. This means recirculating wort has no sneak paths out the side. The other benefit is malt pipes have simple brackets/feet welded onto the outside that allow you to lift your wet grains up and prop the malt pipe on the brew rig to drain or sparge. The BrewZilla has 2 sets of feet for this. One set is halfway up, allowing you to do the deadlift of grain & wort halfway and then let the liquid level drain down. Then when you lift it the full height, it’s not as heavy. It’s simple, but makes the process much better.

Welded-on Carry Handle (top) and Tip Handle (bottom)

There is a cool feature in the BrewZilla which normally only comes on much higher end systems, and that’s the central drain. With a concave bottom with a drain at the lowest point in the center, you don’t have to leave wort behind or goof around with tilting it to get the last drops of wort out at the end. This also enables the malt pipe to extend down lower and thus you can hold more grain (30% more than their Gen3). If you compared to other All-in-one units in the “5 gallon batch” size range, the 23.5 lbs. grain capacity is 30 – 50% more. This of course only matters if you’re trying to make high gravity brews. The drain in the floor is plumbed to the inlet of the pump below, and then you can direct pump output either to an external spigot for fast/easy transfer of wort out after brewing, or up the recirculation pipe for wort to get directed down on top of the mash.

Polished Bottom with Center Drain and Built-in Temp Sensor to Side

Bottom Side of Pump Filter Plate

To help with mash efficiency and mash temperature uniformity, they offer a Heat Exchanger Dish, which is just a stainless dish/plate that sits below your malt pipe and above the central drain. Without this dish in place, the flow of recirculating wort tends to go through the center of your grain bed, and straight out the drain. With the dish there, it directs the flow around the full circumference before it gets to the drain, which helps ensure a broader portion of the grist sees the flow.


Compare Prices, Review Continues Below:


This article contains affiliate links. We may make a small percentage if you use our links to make a purchase. You won’t pay more and you’ll be supporting Homebrew Finds and more content like this. Thank you for your support!


Another helpful option is the neoprene insulation jacket. This helps keep mash temperatures more consistent by cutting down heat loss through the walls of the unit. The jacket on BrewZilla also smartly covers the recirculation pipe to minimize heat loss during wort recirculation. The overall mash temperature response with a multi-step mash was impressive, with more detail provided in the Hands On section, below.

Hands on Trials

First off, all of the different parts were well made with good quality manufacturing. As I’ve found with all Kegland gear, it’s of good quality- but nothing flashy. The one exception was probably the smooth and highly polished dished bottom. That was flashy. And being a previous owner of a 1st Gen Robobrew, I was very happy to see the camlock fitting on the recirculation pipe and see that Kegland was obviously tuned in to customer feedback on their products.

Mashing-in Sequence

Sparging

I brewed three different batches before writing this review. Two of them followed a simple single temperature mash, and the third one I exercised the RAPT Controller more with a multi-step mash profile, with lots of monitoring via my smartphone. I was impressed with the mash efficiency I achieved. There can be a misconception that BIAB = lower mash efficiency, but really, it’s “full volume mash = lower efficiency”. I had previously done experiments with an Anvil Foundry that showed a sparge step can get you mash efficiencies > 80%. Therefore, my batches in the BrewZilla were all done with a sparge step. I rested the malt pipe at the top while pouring heated sparge water through it with a 1-gallon pitcher. The perforated plate sitting on top of the grain bed made it super simple to sparge like this and get a good water distribution pattern. The perforated plate also allowed me to push down very easily and squeeze out remaining liquid in the grains. If you’re in the school of thought that squeezing the grains is bad for your beer, this isn’t relevant for you. For the rest of us, being able to easily squeeze that out without making a mess was awesome. And it meant when I picked up the basket of spent grain, I didn’t have a trail of sugary malt drippings to clean up after. My first batch achieved 77% mash efficiency, the second one 80%, and the third 81%.

Recirc Flow Rate After CFC

I experimented a bit with the Bluetooth RAPT wireless thermometer, but I didn’t properly understand it at first. I thought the concept was I could choose whether to use the built-in sensor at the bottom of the unit or the Bluetooth thermometer, but that wasn’t the case. When you add the Bluetooth thermometer, it will then control to that temperature, but it still uses the built-in sensor as part of your heating in a way that lets you fine tune how the system as a whole responds to temperature steps in your mash. After tinkering with it a bit, I realized it has some really powerful potential, but requires a deeper dive and some experimentation to back it up. So I’ll save that for a future write-up.

Bluetooth RAPT Thermometer

My typical brew system uses a 10-gallon kettle with a pump recirculating wort through a 240V RIMS with a 3500W heating element. With that set-up, I get about 3.1 degrees/minute temperature rise when doing multi-step mash profiles. I was therefore expecting this 120V/1500W system to be slow but was shocked to find similar performance that averaged around 2.5 degrees/minute. I attributed this capability to the neoprene jacket. On the plus side, that means you can do multi-step mashes even on only a 120V outlet and not take all day. But leaving the lid on as you heat to a boil is still a must. With the large opening in its domed top, it still can allow any volatized compounds to flow out.

BrewZilla Mashing by Itself in Basement

I found the RAPT software a bit non-intuitive and as such, had a learning curve to it. Luckily, I did a trial run just with water in it so I could get a feel for where various controls were located and how it worked. I definitely recommend this before you try to do any multi-step mash program, or live monitoring of things from the App. Way less stressful when it’s just water! After I got the hang of it, I was able to monitor my mash well and know what was going on as it chugged away in the basement and I worked at my day job one floor above. One key thing I learned was the in-flight plotting of mash temperature isn’t a continuously updating graph, you have to hit refresh in the App to get the updated data that it is recording and holding. I assume this is for computing efficiency and Wi-Fi bandwidth load management. It was perfectly fine once I figured out how it worked.

Screenshot of RAPT Controller Interface

The RAPT Controller allows you to program in multi-step mashes. But it’s a bit clunky as you figure it out. When you build the profile up using the App or Web interface, that profile sits on the RAPT server. My brain kept wanting to think I was programming the controller directly on the unit, but that’s not how it works. So after you program in the profile, you have to download it to the controller on your unit for it to work. You do all of this through the RAPT portal, and it only requires your BrewZilla to be powered on to let you download to it. This would be cool if you could just export something from Brewfather and then import it in RAPT, but you can’t. However, when you think about it, you probably don’t have that many different mash profiles, so it’s not really a big deal.

Malt Pipe

Draining Malt Pipe

One super cool feature of the mash profile programming is Kegland finally did what many have wanted these controllers to do for a long time. Rather than open loop programming a temperature and a time and guesstimating how long it will take for your mash to reach that temperature, you can tell it to not start counting down your mash step timer until it reaches the temperature. So if you want a 45-minute rest at 150F, you don’t have to think about how long it will take to get to 150F, it just heats up, and then starts the 45-minute timer when you hit 150F. I really liked this. You are also able to set up notifications at either the beginning or end of a particular mash step. I had it send an alert to my phone once it had reached mashout temperature and thus had 10 minutes left in my mash. That was cool, too. This isn’t quite as simple as it sounds, though. What I found was if the PID controller didn’t overshoot my target temp, I spent several minutes closing in on the target, but didn’t hit the temperature to start your countdown timer. So I’d end up with long mash times. I did some experiments with PID gains and the Bluetooth probe that got this working as I wanted, but I’ll detail that in a later write-up.

Rolling Boil at 75-percent Power

There wasn’t a boil timer interface, the controller was really just geared to controlling & monitoring mash temperatures. Not a big deal, as my Brewfather boil timer works great for this, so it isn’t a feature RAPT needs to spend time making. I could easily maintain a robust boil if I wanted to, but I like to keep it at just a good rolling circulation, so I dialed down the heating element power to 75% and maintained a constant churn of the wort and allowed boil-off of 0.4 – 0.5 gallons per hour. And the filter dish at the bottom of the kettle worked great to keep hop debris out of the pump, but not restrict flow. I had a thick cake of hop mush at the end when it was time to clean. Cleaning was fast and easy with parts light and easy to pull out, come apart, and rinse. And with the built-in pump, it was also easy to fill the unit up with cleaning solution at the end, circulate it through the unit & my Counter Flow Chiller to get everything clean.

Chilling Wort Using CFC and Built-in Pump

For wort cooling at the end of the boil, I used the built-in pump and circulated wort through my CFC. With the camlock fitting on the BrewZilla, I could easily hook up my typical ½” silicone tubing hoses. I was unsure if the pump would be up to the job, but it handled it easily. I could get a good volume flow rate with the recirc valve wide open on the BrewZilla and could easily restrict it when I wanted a slower flow.

A couple of pro tips to wrap things up. First, is to make sure you add your grains to the malt pipe BEFORE you lower it into the vessel. This ensures the weight of the grain keeps the bottom plate in place, so that as you lower it down, the water doesn’t push the bottom plate out of position and create a sneak path for whole grains to get through. Second is to make sure you have the plug fully seated in your brew unit. This might sound stupidly logical, but with a 6-foot power cord, you might end up pushing the limits of where you want the unit to sit vs. where the outlet is you’re plugged into. I had the cable become partially unseated and I wasn’t aware- until I went to remove the cord at the end of a long session of PID controller experiments. If the cord isn’t fully seated, you get less electrical contact on the pins and less contact means higher heat as electricity flows through it. I ended up damaging the cord and the receptacle from overheating.

Conclusions

The BrewZilla Gen4 delivered. The controller worked great, and I absolutely loved the step mash ability to start the mash step timer using actual mash temperatures. The RAPT interface wasn’t quite as slick as I would’ve liked but overall worked flawlessly, with no glitches. And I was definitely surprised how well a mere 120V/1500W system could handle mash steps and boil intensity. The well-thought-out little pieces of the malt pipe and various recirculation designs showed to me a system that was engineered with actual brewing hours spent on the unit, which is great. I feel with all of this, I won’t have compromises on my brew day using an all-in-one system versus my bigger 2-vessel system. And that says a lot.

Special thanks to Kegland for providing the unit used for evaluation in this review.

Compare Prices, Review Continues Below:


This article contains affiliate links. We may make a small percentage if you use our links to make a purchase. You won’t pay more and you’ll be supporting Homebrew Finds and more content like this. Thank you for your support!


Data Plots

Related: Hands on Review: Robobrew (BrewZilla v1) All Grain Brewing System

More Photos

Included Immersion Chiller (Fittings Sold Separately)

Collecting Wort for Gravity Check

Control Panel and Cord

Easy Access Pump and Hose Routing Underneath

Glass Lid with Handles

Hanger Plate for Control Panel

Heat Exchanger Dish

Holes in Malt Pipe to Help Flow

Malt Pipe Fits Perfectly in 8 Gallon Bucket

Malt Pipe Sitting at Halfway Point to Drain

Malt Pipe Screen Bottom (Left) and Top (Right)

Hop Debris on Filter Screen At End

Neoprene Jacket

Power Connection for 110V Cord and Multi-pin Connector for Control Panel

Recirc Pipe with Valve and Camlock Fitting

Recirc Pipe, Drain Spigot, and Malt Pipe Lift Handle

Robust Hard Rubber Feet

Convert RoboBrew to BrewZilla

If you’re looking to convert your Robobrew to a BrewZilla an upgrade board is available

robobrew upgrade board

Robobrew Gen 3.1.1 Upgrade Board Set 110 volt via William’s Brewing

More Kegland Gear Reviews!

More Homebrew Finds!

Recent Deals!

We are Homebrew Review HQ!  See Our 10 Most Recent Reviews

This post may contain affiliate links. We may make a commission when you use our links. This will never cost you extra. Thank you for supporting Homebrew Finds!

By Brad Probert.  Check out Brad’s website – beersnobby.com

Special Thanks to Keg King with the help of MoreBeer for providing the unit used for evaluation in this review

Price, promotions and availability can change quickly. Check the product page for current price, description and availability.

Make sure the components you use are compatible and rated for your intended application.  Contact manufacturer with questions about suitability or a specific application.  Always read and follow manufacturer directions. tag:lnksfxd review:bprobobrew rs:7 #tag:tpru tag:watch

Hands on Review: Kegland Inline Secondary Regulator

DuoTight Inline Regulator that has been updated to digital, see below for walk through of that process.

Updated: 5/23/2024

Multi-Pressure CO2 Options

Maintaining multiple CO2 pressures in your kegerator gives you the ability to… keep kegs at different pressures.  This is a requirement to maintain different carbonation levels. It’s also handy if you want to force carbonate a keg more quickly, at a higher pressure, while maintaining your standard serving pressure on a keg that’s already being served or if you want to have a utility line for purging kegs and such. continues below…

The general options for pulling this off are…

  • A multi-pressure primary CO2 regulator – example. This has two (or potentially more) high pressure bodies that allow you set different pressures.
  • Secondary CO2 regulators – example. These have no ability to connect to a CO2 tank directly. They must be connected to a compatible primary.

Both good options, but generally expensive.

Kegland to the rescue. Kegland has introduced economical inline secondary regulators. As of this review there are three options.

But first, more about DuoTight!

Kegland’s DuoTight Fittings are designed to work with EVABarrier Double Wall Tubing.  They offer quick, reliable connections, easy implementation, a variety of fitting options and feature amazing versatility.  They’re also, generally speaking, very well priced.  DuoTights are push to connect fittings and require no tubing clamps.

Check out my extensive Hands on Review

Hands on Review Kegland Inline Regulator w/Gauge

A look at the regulator. It has a pressure gauge, adjustment knob, inlet and outlet DuoTight ports and mounting holes.A closer look at the pressure gauge. This one goes to 60 PSI. Other gauge options may be available. This is a huge improvement vs v1. v1 feature no gauge. There is an updated DuoTight compatible inline (v2) version that has no gauge. That keeps costs down but still adds DuoTight compatibility. If you choose a model without a gauge, this is another great application of a Spunding Valve.

Continue reading

Hands on Review: BrewZilla Gen 4 + Limited Time DEAL at William’s Brewing

Updated: 5/23/2024

This review is by Homebrew Finds Contributor Brad Probert.  Brad is an engineer, expert homebrewer and experienced reviewer.  Grab a link to Brad’s website at the end of this review.


Limited Time Deal

William’s Brewing has select sizes of BrewZilla on sale for a limited time


Hands on Review BrewZilla Gen4

I’ve brewed on several different all-in-one units. Like any brew system, they each have their own strengths and weaknesses. I did a hands-on review of the Robobrew when it first came out in late 2016. It has since changed its name to BrewZilla and is on the 4th generation of the brew unit. As you’d expect with repeated generations, they’ve been able to focus on fixing deficiencies in their previous models and also introduce new features.

The basic premise of an all-in-one brewing system is that your mash and boil kettle are in the

same vessel. So just like Brew In A Bag, after mashing, you pull the grains out and the wort stays behind to be boiled. They use electricity for heat, so they can be used outdoors where you can reach power or indoors where you have a venting system that can take care of all the steam you make during your boil.

BrewZilla Without Jacket

Stamped Volume Markings

Here are some basic stats on the Gen4 BrewZilla. It’s available in a 35-Liter form (for 5-6 gallon batches) with either a 110V setup, or 220V. There is also a larger 65-Liter that is only 220V (targeted to 10-12 gallon batches). The 35L unit holds 9.25 gallons, the mash basket can hold up to 23.5 lbs. of grain, and its electric heating elements can output up to 1500W of power (110V system) or 2400W of power (220V system). The 65L unit holds 17.1 gallons, the mash basket holds 41.5 lbs. of grain, and 3500W of heating power. All the Gen4 units have a pump bolted into the base. The pump can be used not only for wort recirculation during the mash, but also to pump beer through your wort chiller apparatus (should you choose to not use the immersion chiller coil included with the BrewZilla). The pump is more modular and accessible than previous Gen models. To protect the pump from clogging with hop debris during the boil or whirlpool, there is a filter screen (a perforated stainless disc that sits at the bottom of the unit) that sits at the bottom of the kettle. The small magnetic drive pump has a pump head rating of 1.5 – 2.1 m (4.9 – 6.9 ft) and a max flow rate of 11-12 L/min (2.9 – 3.2 gal/min).

Control Panel Notification During Mash Profile

One of the key upgraded features of the Gen4 BrewZilla is the controller. RAPT Is Kegland’s line of wireless connected brewing devices. The BrewZilla now has a RAPT controller so it adds a lot of features that can be monitored and controlled over Wi-Fi. This includes basic things like monitoring temperature from your laptop/cell phone, but also allows you to program complex mash programs online and then download to your BrewZilla. You can also adjust control parameters on the fly such as pump output duty cycle and heater output level. If you get the optional Bluetooth thermometer, you can stick the temperature probe into the middle of your grain bed, and then have the controller use that as its control signal in combination with the built-in temperature sensor that sits on the floor of the unit.

Bluetooth Temp Probe in Middle of Mash

Although All-in-One units are essentially BIAB, they use a stainless steel basket with holes in the bottom of it instead of a bag, and call it a “malt pipe”. These provide functional improvements over a nylon bag. The obvious one is they are way easier to clean. But they also allow you to ensure you get full flow through your grain bed by having holes only on the bottom. This means recirculating wort has no sneak paths out the side. The other benefit is malt pipes have simple brackets/feet welded onto the outside that allow you to lift your wet grains up and prop the malt pipe on the brew rig to drain or sparge. The BrewZilla has 2 sets of feet for this. One set is halfway up, allowing you to do the deadlift of grain & wort halfway and then let the liquid level drain down. Then when you lift it the full height, it’s not as heavy. It’s simple, but makes the process much better.

Welded-on Carry Handle (top) and Tip Handle (bottom)

There is a cool feature in the BrewZilla which normally only comes on much higher end systems, and that’s the central drain. With a concave bottom with a drain at the lowest point in the center, you don’t have to leave wort behind or goof around with tilting it to get the last drops of wort out at the end. This also enables the malt pipe to extend down lower and thus you can hold more grain (30% more than their Gen3). If you compared to other All-in-one units in the “5 gallon batch” size range, the 23.5 lbs. grain capacity is 30 – 50% more. This of course only matters if you’re trying to make high gravity brews. The drain in the floor is plumbed to the inlet of the pump below, and then you can direct pump output either to an external spigot for fast/easy transfer of wort out after brewing, or up the recirculation pipe for wort to get directed down on top of the mash.

Polished Bottom with Center Drain and Built-in Temp Sensor to Side

Bottom Side of Pump Filter Plate

To help with mash efficiency and mash temperature uniformity, they offer a Heat Exchanger Dish, which is just a stainless dish/plate that sits below your malt pipe and above the central drain. Without this dish in place, the flow of recirculating wort tends to go through the center of your grain bed, and straight out the drain. With the dish there, it directs the flow around the full circumference before it gets to the drain, which helps ensure a broader portion of the grist sees the flow.


Compare Prices, Review Continues Below:


This article contains affiliate links. We may make a small percentage if you use our links to make a purchase. You won’t pay more and you’ll be supporting Homebrew Finds and more content like this. Thank you for your support!


Another helpful option is the neoprene insulation jacket. This helps keep mash temperatures more consistent by cutting down heat loss through the walls of the unit. The jacket on BrewZilla also smartly covers the recirculation pipe to minimize heat loss during wort recirculation. The overall mash temperature response with a multi-step mash was impressive, with more detail provided in the Hands On section, below.

Hands on Trials

First off, all of the different parts were well made with good quality manufacturing. As I’ve found with all Kegland gear, it’s of good quality- but nothing flashy. The one exception was probably the smooth and highly polished dished bottom. That was flashy. And being a previous owner of a 1st Gen Robobrew, I was very happy to see the camlock fitting on the recirculation pipe and see that Kegland was obviously tuned in to customer feedback on their products.

Mashing-in Sequence

Sparging

I brewed three different batches before writing this review. Two of them followed a simple single temperature mash, and the third one I exercised the RAPT Controller more with a multi-step mash profile, with lots of monitoring via my smartphone. I was impressed with the mash efficiency I achieved. There can be a misconception that BIAB = lower mash efficiency, but really, it’s “full volume mash = lower efficiency”. I had previously done experiments with an Anvil Foundry that showed a sparge step can get you mash efficiencies > 80%. Therefore, my batches in the BrewZilla were all done with a sparge step. I rested the malt pipe at the top while pouring heated sparge water through it with a 1-gallon pitcher. The perforated plate sitting on top of the grain bed made it super simple to sparge like this and get a good water distribution pattern. The perforated plate also allowed me to push down very easily and squeeze out remaining liquid in the grains. If you’re in the school of thought that squeezing the grains is bad for your beer, this isn’t relevant for you. For the rest of us, being able to easily squeeze that out without making a mess was awesome. And it meant when I picked up the basket of spent grain, I didn’t have a trail of sugary malt drippings to clean up after. My first batch achieved 77% mash efficiency, the second one 80%, and the third 81%.

Recirc Flow Rate After CFC

I experimented a bit with the Bluetooth RAPT wireless thermometer, but I didn’t properly understand it at first. I thought the concept was I could choose whether to use the built-in sensor at the bottom of the unit or the Bluetooth thermometer, but that wasn’t the case. When you add the Bluetooth thermometer, it will then control to that temperature, but it still uses the built-in sensor as part of your heating in a way that lets you fine tune how the system as a whole responds to temperature steps in your mash. After tinkering with it a bit, I realized it has some really powerful potential, but requires a deeper dive and some experimentation to back it up. So I’ll save that for a future write-up.

Bluetooth RAPT Thermometer

My typical brew system uses a 10-gallon kettle with a pump recirculating wort through a 240V RIMS with a 3500W heating element. With that set-up, I get about 3.1 degrees/minute temperature rise when doing multi-step mash profiles. I was therefore expecting this 120V/1500W system to be slow but was shocked to find similar performance that averaged around 2.5 degrees/minute. I attributed this capability to the neoprene jacket. On the plus side, that means you can do multi-step mashes even on only a 120V outlet and not take all day. But leaving the lid on as you heat to a boil is still a must. With the large opening in its domed top, it still can allow any volatized compounds to flow out.

BrewZilla Mashing by Itself in Basement

I found the RAPT software a bit non-intuitive and as such, had a learning curve to it. Luckily, I did a trial run just with water in it so I could get a feel for where various controls were located and how it worked. I definitely recommend this before you try to do any multi-step mash program, or live monitoring of things from the App. Way less stressful when it’s just water! After I got the hang of it, I was able to monitor my mash well and know what was going on as it chugged away in the basement and I worked at my day job one floor above. One key thing I learned was the in-flight plotting of mash temperature isn’t a continuously updating graph, you have to hit refresh in the App to get the updated data that it is recording and holding. I assume this is for computing efficiency and Wi-Fi bandwidth load management. It was perfectly fine once I figured out how it worked.

Screenshot of RAPT Controller Interface

The RAPT Controller allows you to program in multi-step mashes. But it’s a bit clunky as you figure it out. When you build the profile up using the App or Web interface, that profile sits on the RAPT server. My brain kept wanting to think I was programming the controller directly on the unit, but that’s not how it works. So after you program in the profile, you have to download it to the controller on your unit for it to work. You do all of this through the RAPT portal, and it only requires your BrewZilla to be powered on to let you download to it. This would be cool if you could just export something from Brewfather and then import it in RAPT, but you can’t. However, when you think about it, you probably don’t have that many different mash profiles, so it’s not really a big deal.

Malt Pipe

Draining Malt Pipe

One super cool feature of the mash profile programming is Kegland finally did what many have wanted these controllers to do for a long time. Rather than open loop programming a temperature and a time and guesstimating how long it will take for your mash to reach that temperature, you can tell it to not start counting down your mash step timer until it reaches the temperature. So if you want a 45-minute rest at 150F, you don’t have to think about how long it will take to get to 150F, it just heats up, and then starts the 45-minute timer when you hit 150F. I really liked this. You are also able to set up notifications at either the beginning or end of a particular mash step. I had it send an alert to my phone once it had reached mashout temperature and thus had 10 minutes left in my mash. That was cool, too. This isn’t quite as simple as it sounds, though. What I found was if the PID controller didn’t overshoot my target temp, I spent several minutes closing in on the target, but didn’t hit the temperature to start your countdown timer. So I’d end up with long mash times. I did some experiments with PID gains and the Bluetooth probe that got this working as I wanted, but I’ll detail that in a later write-up.

Rolling Boil at 75-percent Power

There wasn’t a boil timer interface, the controller was really just geared to controlling & monitoring mash temperatures. Not a big deal, as my Brewfather boil timer works great for this, so it isn’t a feature RAPT needs to spend time making. I could easily maintain a robust boil if I wanted to, but I like to keep it at just a good rolling circulation, so I dialed down the heating element power to 75% and maintained a constant churn of the wort and allowed boil-off of 0.4 – 0.5 gallons per hour. And the filter dish at the bottom of the kettle worked great to keep hop debris out of the pump, but not restrict flow. I had a thick cake of hop mush at the end when it was time to clean. Cleaning was fast and easy with parts light and easy to pull out, come apart, and rinse. And with the built-in pump, it was also easy to fill the unit up with cleaning solution at the end, circulate it through the unit & my Counter Flow Chiller to get everything clean.

Chilling Wort Using CFC and Built-in Pump

For wort cooling at the end of the boil, I used the built-in pump and circulated wort through my CFC. With the camlock fitting on the BrewZilla, I could easily hook up my typical ½” silicone tubing hoses. I was unsure if the pump would be up to the job, but it handled it easily. I could get a good volume flow rate with the recirc valve wide open on the BrewZilla and could easily restrict it when I wanted a slower flow.

A couple of pro tips to wrap things up. First, is to make sure you add your grains to the malt pipe BEFORE you lower it into the vessel. This ensures the weight of the grain keeps the bottom plate in place, so that as you lower it down, the water doesn’t push the bottom plate out of position and create a sneak path for whole grains to get through. Second is to make sure you have the plug fully seated in your brew unit. This might sound stupidly logical, but with a 6-foot power cord, you might end up pushing the limits of where you want the unit to sit vs. where the outlet is you’re plugged into. I had the cable become partially unseated and I wasn’t aware- until I went to remove the cord at the end of a long session of PID controller experiments. If the cord isn’t fully seated, you get less electrical contact on the pins and less contact means higher heat as electricity flows through it. I ended up damaging the cord and the receptacle from overheating.

Conclusions

The BrewZilla Gen4 delivered. The controller worked great, and I absolutely loved the step mash ability to start the mash step timer using actual mash temperatures. The RAPT interface wasn’t quite as slick as I would’ve liked but overall worked flawlessly, with no glitches. And I was definitely surprised how well a mere 120V/1500W system could handle mash steps and boil intensity. The well-thought-out little pieces of the malt pipe and various recirculation designs showed to me a system that was engineered with actual brewing hours spent on the unit, which is great. I feel with all of this, I won’t have compromises on my brew day using an all-in-one system versus my bigger 2-vessel system. And that says a lot.

Special thanks to Kegland for providing the unit used for evaluation in this review.

Compare Prices, Review Continues Below:


This article contains affiliate links. We may make a small percentage if you use our links to make a purchase. You won’t pay more and you’ll be supporting Homebrew Finds and more content like this. Thank you for your support!


Data Plots

Related: Hands on Review: Robobrew (BrewZilla v1) All Grain Brewing System

More Photos

Included Immersion Chiller (Fittings Sold Separately)

Collecting Wort for Gravity Check

Control Panel and Cord

Easy Access Pump and Hose Routing Underneath

Glass Lid with Handles

Hanger Plate for Control Panel

Heat Exchanger Dish

Holes in Malt Pipe to Help Flow

Malt Pipe Fits Perfectly in 8 Gallon Bucket

Malt Pipe Sitting at Halfway Point to Drain

Malt Pipe Screen Bottom (Left) and Top (Right)

Hop Debris on Filter Screen At End

Neoprene Jacket

Power Connection for 110V Cord and Multi-pin Connector for Control Panel

Recirc Pipe with Valve and Camlock Fitting

Recirc Pipe, Drain Spigot, and Malt Pipe Lift Handle

Robust Hard Rubber Feet

Convert RoboBrew to BrewZilla

If you’re looking to convert your Robobrew to a BrewZilla an upgrade board is available

robobrew upgrade board

Robobrew Gen 3.1.1 Upgrade Board Set 110 volt via William’s Brewing

More Kegland Gear Reviews!

More Homebrew Finds!

Recent Deals!

We are Homebrew Review HQ!  See Our 10 Most Recent Reviews

This post may contain affiliate links. We may make a commission when you use our links. This will never cost you extra. Thank you for supporting Homebrew Finds!

By Brad Probert.  Check out Brad’s website – beersnobby.com

Special Thanks to Keg King with the help of MoreBeer for providing the unit used for evaluation in this review

Price, promotions and availability can change quickly. Check the product page for current price, description and availability.

Make sure the components you use are compatible and rated for your intended application.  Contact manufacturer with questions about suitability or a specific application.  Always read and follow manufacturer directions. tag:lnksfxd review:bprobobrew rs:7 #tag:tpru tag:watch

Hands on Review: FermZilla All Rounder Fermenter

Thank you to HBF Contributor Aaron Nord for this hands on review!  Aaron is an advanced award winning brewer, a long time reader and a serial tipster!

Updated: 5/15/2024

FermZilla All Rounder

Fermenting under pressure has been a technique I have had my eye on for some time now and have felt the urge to experiment with it more and more lately. To me the most appealing benefit of pressurized fermentation is that at the end of fermentation the beer is fully carbonated and ready to drink (not accounting for beers that benefit from a period of conditioning). Other benefits include a potentially quicker fermentation, a higher retention of desirable aroma compounds that otherwise might be off gassed (e.g. hop aromas), and the ability to ferment at warmer temperatures without a high presence of unwanted esters.


Check Current Pricing & Availability, Review Continues Below:


Related Reviews:

Continue reading

Hands on Review: Kegland Hop Bong!

Updated: 6/12/2024

Thank you to HBF Contributor Aaron Nord for this hands on review!  Aaron is an advanced award winning brewer, a long time reader and a serial tipster!

Kegland Hop Bong

Keeping oxygen out of a fermenter after the initial yeast pitch is a goal of most fermentations, with a few exceptions being oxygenating a high gravity batch mid-way through fermentation, barrel-aged ales, or spontaneously fermented ales in open foeders. For a homebrewer who wants to brew a beer outside of those exceptions noted, avoiding oxygen introduction after fermentation has begun is paramount to a quality finished beer, a goal which is sometimes a difficult to attain. Notably, adding dry hops, other flavor components (e.g. wood chips or coffee beans), or clarifying agents (e.g. gelatin fining or Biofine) presents a challenge for most homebrewers if they want to avoid oxygen exposure in the fermenting wort.

There are workarounds and ways for homebrewers to limit oxygen introduction, conceived upon by crafty brewers over the years. Dry hops for example, can be suspended in a muslin bag above the wort by placing a magnet inside the bag and its mating magnet on the outside of the fermenter. In this way, the hops will be in the fermenter at the beginning of fermentation and can be dropped according to the dry hop schedule by simply removing the outside magnet, all without opening the fermenter. Or, to add clarifying agents without cracking the fermenter lid, a brewer can utilize a plastic bottle with a carbonation cap. This method entails adding the liquid substance to a plastic soda bottle and pressurizing the bottle with CO2 via the carbonation cap, purging it, and repeating the process multiple times to ensure the gas inside the bottle is mostly composed of CO2. Then, by using a ball lock jumper, the pressurized bottle can be connected to a fermenter’s ball lock post, if equipped, and the liquid will enter the fermenter, so long as the pressure in the fermenter is less than that of the bottle.

Although these workarounds exist and cut the mustard for my purposes, I was excited when I found out that Kegland was set to release a product that appeared to be a simpler solution all around. In looking into it further I found that it was advertised to have additional uses, aside from the main feature of enabling hop, flavor, or fining additions to the fermenter while limiting oxygen ingress. This highly anticipated product is called the Hop Bong.

I have been a proud owner of a Kegland FermZilla All Rounder fermenterHands on Review – for over two years now and have nothing but good things to say about it. As a manufacturer, Kegland is a homebrewing gear innovator and a leader in the market. They are continuing to come up with novel equipment and tools that span their wide array of product offerings including many for their FermZilla fermenter line. I was excited to see what the Hop Bong could offer as an addition to my All Rounder fermenter.


Kegland Hop Bong Current Price & Availability:

via MoreBeer

via William’s Brewing

Continue reading

Hands on Review: Kegland Cannular Bench Top Can Seamer + An OUTSTANDING Deal!

Updated: 5/21/2024

This review is by Homebrew Finds Contributor Brad Probert.  Brad is an engineer, expert homebrewer and experienced reviewer.  Grab a link to Brad’s website at the end of this review.

Kegland Cannular Can Seamer

It’s been a long road for craft beer to be accepted in cans and not bottles. But it has been well established that cans are OK, too, and some take it even further to tout cans as a superior storage vessel for beer. I’ll avoid a full-blown comparison of the pros & cons of each, but I do feel it worth noting a couple of the selling points cans have. One is the claim that cans provide better storage with a more oxygen-proof seal than bottle caps, and 100% light blocking versus even brown colored glass. There is probably lots of debate on those two topics, but one benefit that is universally recognized is transportability. Cans are lighter and more compact, a whole lot less fragile, and you can take them to beaches and pools where glass containers are banned.

On the homebrew scale, until recently, the canners available have either been hand-crank monstrosities that look like an exhibit from a museum on the industrial revolution, or electrically driven units that look like steampunk movie props and cost a couple thousand dollars. Then in 2019, KegLand from Australia started exporting their Cannular can seamer that sells for $525 for the unit + power supply and is electrically powered. This changed the landscape significantly in the homebrew world, making canning much more within reach.


Rare, Limited Time Deal:

Cannular Bench Top Can Seamer CAN100

  • MoreBeer has Cannular on sale for $399.99. That’s a $150 savings.
  • For some pricing clarity, I’ve seen USED units sell for more than this.
  • This is a rare deal because the regular version of the Cannular is under a MAP agreement.  That means that it, generally speaking, cannot be discounted.  I don’t know if this is a one-off thing or if the reverse roller version will be an ongoing offering.
  • Get Free Shipping: Shipping is also free to most US addresses with a qualifying $59 order.  This includes bulky cases of new cans.
  • Learn More! Hands on Review: Kegland Cannular Bench Top Can Seamer – Homebrew Canner

Cannular Bench Top Can Seamer CAN100


Compare Prices, Review Continues Below:


Empty CanLid on Foam

The Cannular operates with a combination of manual lever pulling and electric motor spinning. You start the process out with an empty aluminum can with no top on it. You sanitize the can, fill it with beer, and then take a sanitized lid and set it down on top of the can (ideally on foam, to ensure minimization of air in your canned product). From there, it gets placed on a small pedestal and a lever turn raises the can up into the machinery of the can seaming operation and locks it at that height. The push of a button gets the motor spinning and the can on its platform starts spinning around. Grabbing a different lever, you push back and hold it for a couple seconds, then pull it toward you for a couple seconds, and you’re done. Turn off the motor, lower your can back down on the pedestal, and you’ve canned one beer.

Continue reading

Beverage Doctor – Waterproof pH Meter via MoreBeer – on sale for $43.99, Limited Availability, BEATS 2019 Deal

Beverage Doctor - Pen Style PH Meter MT624

Beverage Doctor – Pen Style PH Meter from MoreBeer

More Info

From the product description, check product page for current description, price and availability:

Looking for an easy to use pH meter at a great price? The Beverage Doctor is here to help you get your mashes to the perfect pH.

The Beverage Doctor will get you a very accurate reading with its 0.01 pH resolution. The calibration process couldn’t be easier to perform, just place the probe in the buffer solution closest to pH of the sample you’ll be testing and press the button! This pH meter also includes ATC (Automatic Temperature Control) so you don’t have to get your sample all the way down to room temperature before you take your reading.

The Beverage Doctor features a replaceable probe in case yours is lost or damaged. Homebrewing can be a tough environment for your pH probe so we feel you shouldn’t have to buy a whole new pH meter everytime your probe breaks. The cap that holds the probe storage solution has a very tight seal and should prevent your probe from drying out while not in use. Don’t worry about getting this meter wet either, because the entire unit is waterproof!

  • Replaceable probe
  • ATC (Automatic Temperature Control)
  • Waterproof
  • Accurate to 0.01 pH
  • Easy 3 point calibration
  • LR44/AG13 batteries included

 

Limited Availability Deal of the Day: As of this posting, this is marked down to $43.99 as a MoreBeer Deal of the DayShipping is also free to addresses in the contiguous US with most $59 Orders. Availability: This is available today only, while supplies last. Quantities are limited. Check the MoreBeer’s Deal of the Day to check today’s offering.

Product Description – Here – Use coupon code BEERDEAL to get this discount.

Beverage Doctor – Pen Style PH Meter MT624

From the “prices on everything continue to skyrocket” department, this BEATS a deal of the day that was offered in September of 2019. At that time it was offered for $44.99. The lowest historical price I have recorded for this $39.99 back in July of 2019.

deals on sacks of malt

MORE MoreBeer Deals!…This post contains affiliate links. We may make a commission when you use our links. This will never cost you extra. Thank you for supporting Homebrew Finds!

Price, promotions and availability can change quickly. Check the product page for current price, description and availability. tag:b3peroff