Category Archives: Conicals

Fermzilla Molded Pressure Kit – convert Fermzilla Fermenters into UniVessel Kegs… $19.99 -or- FREE

Fermzilla Molded Pressure Kit

Fermzilla Molded Pressure Kit via William’s Brewing

More Info

From the product description, check product page for current description, price and availability:

This kit fits both the 27 and 55 Liter Fermzilla and turns the Fermzilla into a true uni tank, which is a conical fermenter for fermenting, carbonating, and dispensing. Includes two ball lock connectors that will accept either a gas or beer ball lock, a 22″ food grade silicone hose, and a stainless float ball so you always draw the clearest beer first. The plastic threads are safer to use on the plastic Fermzilla lid than stainless threads.

One of the primary uses is to ferment under pressure which reduces ester production and fusel alcohol production. That means that you can ferment warmer than you normally would, even making lagers at room temperature. Most commercial beer is fermented under pressure just due to the size of commercial tanks and the pressure that is created by the column of beer. It is one of the differences between commercial brewing and homebrewing. The Fermzilla lid has a built in relief valve that will blow at 35psi and with this kit you can also attach an external ball lock spundling valve (not included) to fine tune the pressure release.

When you are fermenting under pressure the beer is already carbonated when you are done fermenting. You can control the level of carbonation by using an adjustable pressure relief. The idea is that the FermZilla can eliminate kegging and you can serve directly from the fermenter. This saves a lot of labor and cleaning, but there will probably still be times that you want to keg. With this kit, use a ball lock beer line to connect the FermZilla to your keg and enjoy the easiest kegging experience ever. You can also choose to send carbonated beer through a beer filter on the way to your keg.

Because the beer always has a CO2 blanket through fermentation and during any transfers out, oxidation is eliminated. When you cold crash you won’t be sucking air back in through an airlock.

• Ferment beer under pressure to reduce ester and fusel alcohol production
• Ability to always draw clear beer with the unique, floating draw tube
• Keg already carbonated beer
• Use co2 to push beer into a keg or though a filter into a keg
• Carbonate and serve beer directly from the FermZilla, eliminating kegging all together


 

As of this posting, William’s Brewing is selling this for just $19.99. Shipping is free or reasonably priced flat rate to addresses in the lower 48 states depending on your order size for most items.

Or, Get On FREE…

  • William’s Brewing is giving away free pressure kits with the purchase of either 27 or 55 liter Fermzilla Fermenters.
  • No coupon code is needed just check the box on each product page to get your free pressure kit.

Complete Fermzilla Lineup at William’s Brewing

Visit William’s Brewing – Web Only Clearance Sale

More: Recent William’s Brewing Finds

Price, promotions and availability can change quickly. Check the product page for current price, description and availability. rp:wmsfermzkeg

FREE Pressure Kit with Fermzilla Purchase – Convert Fermzilla to Serving Keg!

Fermzilla Molded Pressure Kit via William’s Brewing

More Info

From the product description, check product page for current description, price and availability:

This kit fits both the 27 and 55 Liter Fermzilla and turns the Fermzilla into a true uni tank, which is a conical fermenter for fermenting, carbonating, and dispensing. Includes two ball lock connectors that will accept either a gas or beer ball lock, a 22″ food grade silicone hose, and a stainless float ball so you always draw the clearest beer first. The plastic threads are safer to use on the plastic Fermzilla lid than stainless threads.

One of the primary uses is to ferment under pressure which reduces ester production and fusel alcohol production. That means that you can ferment warmer than you normally would, even making lagers at room temperature. Most commercial beer is fermented under pressure just due to the size of commercial tanks and the pressure that is created by the column of beer. It is one of the differences between commercial brewing and homebrewing. The Fermzilla lid has a built in relief valve that will blow at 35psi and with this kit you can also attach an external ball lock spundling valve (not included) to fine tune the pressure release.

When you are fermenting under pressure the beer is already carbonated when you are done fermenting. You can control the level of carbonation by using an adjustable pressure relief. The idea is that the FermZilla can eliminate kegging and you can serve directly from the fermenter. This saves a lot of labor and cleaning, but there will probably still be times that you want to keg. With this kit, use a ball lock beer line to connect the FermZilla to your keg and enjoy the easiest kegging experience ever. You can also choose to send carbonated beer through a beer filter on the way to your keg.

Because the beer always has a CO2 blanket through fermentation and during any transfers out, oxidation is eliminated. When you cold crash you won’t be sucking air back in through an airlock.

• Ferment beer under pressure to reduce ester and fusel alcohol production
• Ability to always draw clear beer with the unique, floating draw tube
• Keg already carbonated beer
• Use co2 to push beer into a keg or though a filter into a keg
• Carbonate and serve beer directly from the FermZilla, eliminating kegging all together


 

  • William’s Brewing is giving away free pressure kits with the purchase of either 27 or 55 liter Fermzilla Fermenters.
  • No coupon code is needed just check the box on each product page to get your free pressure kit.
  • Shipping is free or reasonably priced flat rate to addresses in the contiguous US depending on your order size for most items.

Complete Fermzilla Lineup at William’s Brewing – Fermzilla Molded Pressure Kit

Visit William’s Brewing – Web Only Clearance Sale

More: Recent William’s Brewing Finds

Price, promotions and availability can change quickly. Check the product page for current price, description and availability.

If you’ve been waiting… Spike Brewing Flex+, CF5, CF10 and CF15 Conicals In Stock

From Spike: Our Flex+, CF5, CF10 and CF15 have been out of stock for a little bit due to high demand. However on Thursday (3/4) at 11am CST the Flex+, CF5, CF10 and CF15 will be put back into stock with our remaining 1 port lid inventory. We have limited quantities and predict to sell out.

Spike Brewing Fermenters!


From HBF: I have no idea how many of each of these they’ll have in stock, but things like this from Spike sell out notoriously quickly.  They may have plenty, but my suggestion is to be ready to order.

Reviews!

Hands on Review: Spike Conical Fermenters – FINALLY IN STOCK!

spike conical review

This review is by Homebrew Finds Reader Benji S.  Benji has been brewing for 10 years.  His favorite style is Festbier.  He’s an all grain brewer and member of WIZA (Whidbey Island Zymurgy Association).  Check him out on Instagram at neon_hop


Limited Time Availability Update, Review Continues Below:

From Spike: Our Flex+, CF5, CF10 and CF15 have been out of stock for a little bit due to high demand. However on Thursday (3/4) at 11am CST the Flex+, CF5, CF10 and CF15 will be put back into stock with our remaining 1 port lid inventory. We have limited quantities and predict to sell out.

Spike Brewing Fermenters!


After well over a year of evaluating, I splurged recently and got a Spike Conical (the CF5). I’ve seen quite a few others going through this debate period, so I wanted to provide a hot take to help others in their own decision making process. So far I’ve assembled and prepped it for my first brews, but haven’t actually used it yet. Most of the points here will be about equipment quality/features rather than practice.

For context; I added on the temp control bundle with heater, leg extensions, casters, extended bracing shelf, and a few other nice to haves. So some of these will cover things that aren’t part of the “core” conical package.


Compare Prices, Review Continues Below:


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Hands on Review: Spike Brewing Flex Fermentor – FINALLY IN STOCK!

This review is by Homebrew Finds Contributor Brad Probert.  Brad is an engineer, expert homebrewer and experienced reviewer.  Grab a link to Brad’s website at the end of this review.


Limited Time Availability Update, Review Continues Below:

From Spike: Our Flex+, CF5, CF10 and CF15 have been out of stock for a little bit due to high demand. However on Thursday (3/4) at 11am CST the Flex+, CF5, CF10 and CF15 will be put back into stock with our remaining 1 port lid inventory. We have limited quantities and predict to sell out.

Spike Brewing Fermenters!


Spike Flex Stainless Fermentor

Hands on Review: Spike Brewing Equipment Flex Fermentor

Stainless steel is highly valued in homebrewing because of its durability and ease of cleaning. When used in fermentors, this ease of cleaning means you don’t spend as much time scrubbing yeast crust and dry hop debris off the walls of your vessel when done fermenting. And since your beer spends so much time in contact with the surface of your fermentor, it’s easy for aromas to leech in over time to plastic fermentors. Glass of course doesn’t have this problem, but it does have the problem of shattering if you drop it…


Compare Prices, Review Continues Below


Spike is well-known for their heavy duty stainless kettles and free-standing conical fermentors. With all that stainless laying around in their shop, it’s no surprise that they’re now entering the category of “stainless bucket fermentors”. These bucket fermentors are smaller in size than the long-legged conical fermentors. What’s surprising to me is the price difference between the stainless bucket fermentors and taller conical fermentors. Even with the same holding capacity, you’re paying a few hundred dollars extra just to get a conical fermentor up on stilts. The stainless buckets offer essentially the same features, they just require you to crouch down- which to me, is an acceptable compromise.

Weld Flange from the Outside
TC Flange Seamless Surface in Contact with Beer

Spike’s new Flex fermentor is a bucket fermentor (crouching required) that has a 7.5 gallon volume, and has a 45-degree angle cone on the bottom. Utilizing the same 1.5” TC flanges that they’ve mastered the welding with their Spike+ kettles, you can interchange pieces from the Spike accessory catalog for a thermowell and a draining valve. It comes with a rack arm when time to drain that can be rotated by loosening the 1.5” TC clamp slightly and turning it. That feature is designed for those that want to take advantage of avoiding the fallen yeast that has collected in the 45-degree cone, but want to rotate the arm while draining to try to get as much viable beer out of it as possible. And the racking arm has a simple but ingenious bump welded onto it so you know which direction the pickup tube is pointing while you’re trying to rotate it from the outside .

Polished Interior with Etched Volume MarkPickup Tube Rotated Down into Cone

The fermentor walls are ultra-polished. While this has a super-glam aspect that’s sure to dazzle your friends, it serves a practical purpose as well. The polishing process eliminates any kind of surface roughness, which makes it even easier to clean. The inside of the vessel contains electrically etched black volume markings every 0.5 gallons, the same as they have on their kettles. The base is supported by 3 sturdy legs with rubber caps on them to keep it from sliding around on floors (or scratching your floor).

Lid Clamped on with Seal Visible

The lid looks like something from a 1920s diving helmet. In the middle of the lid, there’s a giant 4” TC port that holds a polished clear hard plastic window so you can easily see what’s going on inside your fermentor without having to open the lid. The base Flex model has a hole for a rubber stopper and airlock, and 5 latches that hook over the edge of the lid and onto a flange on the base. This base latch and seal set-up is capable of holding 2 psi of internal pressure. The Flex+ model uses a band clamp that goes around the circumference of the lid and tightens down with a screw/nut feature. And the hole for the bung/airlock is replaced by another 1.5” TC port. This ups the pressure holding capability of the unit to 15 psi.

With its short & stout size, the Flex can fit in shorter areas, but it is pretty wide. From the bottom to the top of a 3-piece airlock, it stands 22” tall. The widest diameter, with the stackup of the racking arm and a Spike butterfly valve with a camlock fitting at the end of it, is 21” across. If those dimensions don’t work for your fermentation chamber, Spike also has a version of its TC-100 temperature control system available that makes use of some common components from their unitank conicals and a form-fitted neoprene jacket sized to the Flex dimensions.

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Hands on Review: Delta Brewing Systems Fermtank + Limited Time Deal


Limited Time Deal, Review Continues Below:

5% Off Delta Brewing Systems – remember promo code HBF5


Delta Brewing Fermtank

The world of fermentors is fairly expansive. On one end of the spectrum, you have the food grade plastic buckets, and at the other you have stainless conicals up on their stilts. In the middle between these two sits stainless bucket fermentors. They’re more expensive than plastic buckets, to be sure. But they have most of the function and features of the full-sized conicals without the full price tag. Delta Brewing Systems Fermtank is a stainless steel bucket fermentor.

Brushed Stainless Exterior and Lid Clasps


Check Current Price and Availability, Review Continues Below:


Delta Industries has been in business for 33 years. The main company is an air compressor sales, service, and engineering house. They have worked with various businesses including breweries across the US as well as some overseas, providing clean compressed air and glycol chillers. Delta Brewing Systems is the part of Delta Industries that manages the beer brewing business. They started offering a handful of homebrew products in July of 2019, and have started steadily expanding their portfolio of homebrewing gear throughout 2020.

CO2 Pressure Transfer to Keg!

The Fermtank was one of their first homebrew offerings. It is made from 304 Stainless Steel, and is 8 gallons in size. That size allows you to ferment 5.5 – 6 gallon batches while giving plenty of head space for fermentation krausen and dry hop additions without overflowing. There are volume markings stamped in large size in both liters and gallons, starting from 5 gallons and up. It has a domed lid with an engineered seal which allows it to handle up to 4 psi, for fermenting under pressure or doing pressurized CO2 transfers. With the blow-off hose barb sitting at the top of this dome, the fermentor is 27” tall. But it has adjustable height legs with 4 positions, allowing up to an additional 3” of height.

Adjustable Legs on Shortest Setting

Full-sized conicals in breweries have steeper angles on their cone that allow the harvesting of yeast, or dumping of trub from your fermentation so you can secondary in the same vessel. The angle of the cone on bucket fermentors isn’t steep enough to allow this harvesting or dumping. However, you do get the advantage of the spigot on the fermentor being at the top of the cone. So when you transfer out of your fermentor, you can do this at a level that’s above the fermentation sediment, without leaving behind a lot of beer. The Fermtank’s spigot has an angled pickup tube so it pulls beer from the center of the fermentor, away from any sediment that’s collected on the walls. Although it has a large 3/4″ valve at the very bottom of the cone, its purpose is really for ease of clean-up, rather than the harvesting of yeast.

Dial thermometer

The body of the fermentor has a thermowell, and it comes with a dial thermometer that can be inserted to monitor temperature. The thermowell can also be used to install a digital temperature probe for temperature logging or fermentation control. And for robust fermentation temperature control, Delta offers a Fermtank Heating & Chilling Kit. The kit includes an insulated neoprene jacket form-fitted to the Fermtank, with openings for all of the external hardware bits. For heating, it contains an electric heating belt that wraps around the bottom edge above the cone and attaches with Velcro strips.

Neoprene JacketElectric Heating PadHeat Wrap Attached to Fermentor

The Heating & Chilling Kit comes Neoprene Insulated Jacket with a lid that has additional holes for some extra hardware. There is a large stainless cooling loop that gets secured through the lid with a tightening nut and O-ring. It has barbed fittings to connect the cooling hoses on the outside while the coils extend down on the inside. There’s also a long thermowell that comes in through the lid and sits down in the beer, keeping some distance from the cooling coils to provide a more average/mixed temperature. The cooling lines attach to a coolant circulation pump, to circulate cooling water from your own source of cold water, or to a glycol chiller if you have one. The control of turning on and off the coolant pump or electric heating belt is done via an Inkbird ITC-308 controller, with its hardwired temperature probe.

Hands on Review

The Fermtank was similar to other stainless bucket fermentors I’d used, but had several unique features I was interested to try out. Overall, the build quality was very good- smooth welds, nice finishes, no sharp edges, and smooth functioning moving parts. The inside of the fermentor was shiny and well-polished. Beyond the bling factor, that actually made clean-up much easier, as fermentation crud came off with notably less effort.

Highly Polished InteriorRacking Arm

The 8 gallon size was nice. Other fermentors go for a 6 or 7 gallon volume, and I get yeast krausen pushing its way out through a blow-off tube on very active fermentations. I fermented a few batches in the Fermtank with high activity yeasts, and only ever had CO2 gas coming out of the blow-off. That extra gallon of space was nice at keeping things clean in my brew basement.

Robust Handles for Empty or Full Fermentor

At first, the little adjustable leg extensions seemed tedious as I used a screwdriver and set of pliers to remove two sets of screws and nuts on each leg, and then reinstall at the fully extended 3” of extra height. However, that small boost meant the transfer spigot was easier to access for wort samples or hooking up my transfer hose. And the lid at a higher height meant less bending over when filling the fermentor or adding dry hops. I wouldn’t say it was a “game changer” or anything revolutionary like that, it just made the overall process a bit nicer.

Fermentation with Chilled Water Connected

The Heating & Chilling Kit worked great for keeping temperature controlled during fermentation. The cooling coils arrived slightly compressed, with the loops of tubes close together. I had to stretch it by gently pulling on the coils at either end until it lined up with the holes on opposite sides of the lid. I used a 10-gallon Igloo cooler filled with 4 gallons of water and 5 frozen 2-Liter bottles of ice to put the cooling pump in. With all of the loops and length of the cooling coils, it was super effective at chilling the wort quickly. I actually found I could stop cooling the wort in my brew kettle a few minutes early to save water, and the cooling coils in the fermentor would bring it down to the final yeast pitch temperature easily.

A tip I would pass along is to install the spigot (O-ring on the outside, tightening nut on the inside) before you put the neoprene jacket on. I wasn’t sure if I could properly stretch it over the spigot to get the hole lined up properly, so I tried installing the spigot after the jacket was on. As a result, I didn’t get it tightened properly, and I had a slight amount of beer weep out on one batch. It only amounted to about 2 drops on the floor, but it did get the neoprene jacket dirty. Luckily, this cleaned very easily. I then learned I could install the spigot and its tightening nut first, and stretch the neoprene jacket over it afterwards without any issue.

Spigot and Dump Valve

The last unique feature on the Fermtank was the dump valve on the bottom of the fermentor. This helped the Fermtank excel in its list of things that made cleanup easy. Ease of clean-up is not something you get excited about when looking at a product page on a website, but being the one task I’m certain all brewers enjoy least, the benefits to an easy clean-up are widely appreciated. The drain/dump valve at the bottom was great for clean-up. With my other fermentors, my usual process is to dump all the contents in the sink and go through repeated rinse & dump cycles until it gets mostly clean. Then a repeated version of this with cleaning solution. But with the Fermtank, I just set it in the sink and opened the drain valve. I went through all of those processes without having to do any tipping or dumping- it just ran out the open valve. It sounds like a simple benefit, but it was great. The highly-polished inside made all the yeast & hop scum clean off easily and require very little scrubbing to be spotless again. By leaving the drain valve open after cleaning, any remnants of water would simply run out rather than collect in a little pond in the bottom of the fermentor. If you currently ferment in carboys or anything with a smaller lid, you’ll definitely appreciate the wide opening for easy cleaning without requiring any funky angle bent into your scrubbing brush.

Transfer from Kettle to Fermentor

Conclusions

Overall, the Fermtank delivered the typical benefits of a stainless bucket fermentor, as expected. What was unexpected was how beneficial its unique features were. The ease of cleanup was definitely a factor that stood out over other fermentors. And the heating & chilling kit performed great, and is what I would say is an almost mandatory addition. When you’re ready to upgrade your fermenting system, the Fermtank is well worth the investment.

Check Current Price and Availability:

More Photos

Accessories IncludedChilling Coil and ThermowellDomed Base LidDomed Lid with Extra Holes for CoolingSilicone Lid SealRinsing Off Hop ResidueHop Sludge Being Cleaned OutRinsed Out Fermentor

More Homebrew Finds!

Last 50 Finds!Reviews | Let’s be Friends!

More Fermenter Reviews!

Homebrew Reviews: Fermenters

This review is by Homebrew Finds Contributor Brad Probert.  Brad is an engineer, expert homebrewer and experienced reviewer.  Grab a link to Brad’s website at the end of this review.

Special Thanks to Delta Brewing Systems for providing the unit used for evaluation in this review.

By Brad Probert.  Check out Brad’s website – beersnobby.com

More: Our Last Fifty Finds!

review:dbsfermtank tag:tpru

Hands on Review: Spike Brewing Flex Fermentor

This review is by Homebrew Finds Contributor Brad Probert.  Brad is an engineer, expert homebrewer and experienced reviewer.  Grab a link to Brad’s website at the end of this review.

Spike Flex Stainless Fermentor

Hands on Review: Spike Brewing Equipment Flex Fermentor

Stainless steel is highly valued in homebrewing because of its durability and ease of cleaning. When used in fermentors, this ease of cleaning means you don’t spend as much time scrubbing yeast crust and dry hop debris off the walls of your vessel when done fermenting. And since your beer spends so much time in contact with the surface of your fermentor, it’s easy for aromas to leech in over time to plastic fermentors. Glass of course doesn’t have this problem, but it does have the problem of shattering if you drop it…


Compare Prices, Review Continues Below


Spike is well-known for their heavy duty stainless kettles and free-standing conical fermentors. With all that stainless laying around in their shop, it’s no surprise that they’re now entering the category of “stainless bucket fermentors”. These bucket fermentors are smaller in size than the long-legged conical fermentors. What’s surprising to me is the price difference between the stainless bucket fermentors and taller conical fermentors. Even with the same holding capacity, you’re paying a few hundred dollars extra just to get a conical fermentor up on stilts. The stainless buckets offer essentially the same features, they just require you to crouch down- which to me, is an acceptable compromise.

Weld Flange from the Outside
TC Flange Seamless Surface in Contact with Beer

Spike’s new Flex fermentor is a bucket fermentor (crouching required) that has a 7.5 gallon volume, and has a 45-degree angle cone on the bottom. Utilizing the same 1.5” TC flanges that they’ve mastered the welding with their Spike+ kettles, you can interchange pieces from the Spike accessory catalog for a thermowell and a draining valve. It comes with a rack arm when time to drain that can be rotated by loosening the 1.5” TC clamp slightly and turning it. That feature is designed for those that want to take advantage of avoiding the fallen yeast that has collected in the 45-degree cone, but want to rotate the arm while draining to try to get as much viable beer out of it as possible. And the racking arm has a simple but ingenious bump welded onto it so you know which direction the pickup tube is pointing while you’re trying to rotate it from the outside .

Polished Interior with Etched Volume MarkPickup Tube Rotated Down into Cone

The fermentor walls are ultra-polished. While this has a super-glam aspect that’s sure to dazzle your friends, it serves a practical purpose as well. The polishing process eliminates any kind of surface roughness, which makes it even easier to clean. The inside of the vessel contains electrically etched black volume markings every 0.5 gallons, the same as they have on their kettles. The base is supported by 3 sturdy legs with rubber caps on them to keep it from sliding around on floors (or scratching your floor).

Lid Clamped on with Seal Visible

The lid looks like something from a 1920s diving helmet. In the middle of the lid, there’s a giant 4” TC port that holds a polished clear hard plastic window so you can easily see what’s going on inside your fermentor without having to open the lid. The base Flex model has a hole for a rubber stopper and airlock, and 5 latches that hook over the edge of the lid and onto a flange on the base. This base latch and seal set-up is capable of holding 2 psi of internal pressure. The Flex+ model uses a band clamp that goes around the circumference of the lid and tightens down with a screw/nut feature. And the hole for the bung/airlock is replaced by another 1.5” TC port. This ups the pressure holding capability of the unit to 15 psi.

With its short & stout size, the Flex can fit in shorter areas, but it is pretty wide. From the bottom to the top of a 3-piece airlock, it stands 22” tall. The widest diameter, with the stackup of the racking arm and a Spike butterfly valve with a camlock fitting at the end of it, is 21” across. If those dimensions don’t work for your fermentation chamber, Spike also has a version of its TC-100 temperature control system available that makes use of some common components from their unitank conicals and a form-fitted neoprene jacket sized to the Flex dimensions.

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Rare Deal: 14 Gallon Blichmann Fermenator Conical with Tri Clamp Fittings – $649.99

Blichmann Fermenator Conical - 14 gal (Tri Clamp Fittings)

Blichmann Fermenator Conical – 14 gal (Tri Clamp Fittings) via MoreBeer

More Info

From the product description, check product page for current description, price and availability:

This stainless steel conical fermentor features a weld-free interior, a dump valve for removing yeast and sediment, and a rotating racking arm for transferring. Prior to bottling or kegging, you can dump your yeast and trub out of the bottom, making for a very clean transfer. This helps with a cleaner, crisper beer everytime! The lid has a removable soda keg-style hatch that is pressure capable, allowing you to easily transfer using CO2 to minimize air exposure. Optional casters and leg extensions are available as well. The 14 Gallon Fermenator is designed to ferment 10 gallons at a time.

 

  • This is on sale for $649.99. That’s a $45 discount.
  • Rare Deal: This is a MAP item.  MAP = Minimum Advertised Price.  It’s an agreement between sellers and manufacturer’s not to sell an item below a certain price.  This generally sells for about the same price no matter where you purchase it from and rarely discounted.

Blichmann Fermenator Conical – 14 gal (Tri Clamp Fittings) BL214

More Fermentation Related!

MoreDeals! at MoreBeer:

More: Recent MoreBeer Finds

Price, promotions and availability can change quickly. Check the product page for current price, description and availability.

Hands on Review: Ss Brewtech Brew Bucket Fermenter!

This review is by Homebrew Finds Contributor Brad Probert.  Brad is an engineer, expert homebrewer and experienced reviewer.  Grab a link to Brad’s website at the end of this review.

Ss Brewtech Brew Bucket

Right from the start I knew there was something special with the Ss Brewtech fermenter as I opened the box it came in. Having received some gear that came out of torn and collapsing boxes recently, it stood out to me how the box was completely together. While you might chalk that up to how careful the delivery guy was, I could tell this box was designed with purpose. The thickness of the layers, and the construction of the layers were clearly designed to handle both scrapes and crushing loads. All this might seem trivial, until you unbox that new shiny piece of equipment you’ve spent your hard-earned dollars on and find it scratched, scuffed, or slightly out of round. With the thought and purpose Ss Brewtech put into their packaging, you can tell that they wouldn’t accept those careless things to happen to their equipment. And that counts.


Compare Price, Models & Availability, Review Continues Below:


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7.9 FermZilla Pressure Fermenter – On Sale for $89.99 + Free DuoTight Spunding Valve, Pre-Order

FermZilla All Rounder Pressure Brewing Kit - 7.9 gal. / 30 L FE118

Fermenting Under Pressure

Pressurized fermentations are becoming increasingly popular, and for a good reason. Some of the benefits that you gain from fermenting beer under pressure are: Lower ester production, being able to ferment at higher temperatures without producing off-flavors, and having your beer carbonated by the end of fermentation (rather than carbonating separately for over a week!). Called Unitanks because you can use them for both fermentation and carbonating. You can serve beer directly from uni tanks, counter pressure fill bottles or easily transfer beer into kegs using pressure.

Fermenting lagers under pressure is a huge benefit of unitank. When yeast ferment under pressure, the production of fruity esters is greatly reduced. This can allow you to brew a lager at 70F an obtain traditional lager flavor. All of the fementers listed below also allow for fermenting under no pressure or greatly reduced pressure which is preferable for making ales where the fruity esters are an essential part of the flavor profile.

  • MoreBeer has introduced several FermZilla Pressure Fermenter options.  Including conicals and All Rounder style fermetners.
  • As of this posting they are available as a pre-order.  All options are on sale and include a free DuoTight Spunding Valve!.
  • Shipping is free with a qualifying $59 order to many US addresses

Fermenting Under Pressure at MoreBeer – sorts to show sale items first

This makes the pictured – FermZilla All Rounder Pressure Brewing Kit – 7.9 gal. / 30 L FE118 – just $89.99 and you get the free Spunding Valve pressure kit

Price, promotions and availability can change quickly. Check the product page for current price, description and availability.

MoreDeals! at MoreBeer:

More: Recent MoreBeer Finds