Category Archives: Guest Posts

Epoxy Flooring for Your Home Brewery – Tips and Tricks – Choosing, Installing and Repairing

This is a How To Guest Post by Brew Floors. Brew Floors offers a wide variety of epoxy floor coating systems for virtually any budget or application. All epoxy products come with necessary installation accessories, non skid additive, and complete instructions. All systems are easy to apply, and require NO special skills. Simply follow the included instructions. We also offer free, unlimited phone or email support if you have questions.


As of this posting, coupon code hbf gets 7% off your entire order.  This bundles with any existing sales or promos and there is no limit on order size.  Check site for up to the minute availability.

Save on Brew Floors – remember promo code hbf


Factors to Consider When Choosing Epoxy Flooring For Your Brewery

Choosing the right flooring system can be hard. However, it doesn’t need to be! When you are in the planning phases of building your brewery you need to take in these factors when deciding on an epoxy flooring system.

Usage: Every brewery, whether home or commercial has different levels of usage. If you are building a home brewery in your garage, basement, or outdoor house we recommend using a 2 layer coating system which is ideal for smaller home breweries. Home breweries may face less harsh chemical in the brewing process. If you’re building a commercial brewery you should consider using a 2 or 3 layer coating system that has a chemical resistant top coat.

Budget: Depending on what your budget is this can big a factor when deciding what type of flooring system you want to purchase. It is always recommended that you invest heavily in this part of the project so you don’t have floor issue down the road. Brew Floors flooring system start at $0.99 per square foot and go up to $5.50 square foot.

Current Floor Condition: There are many different types of floor conditions. There are new or unpainted/unsealed concrete, sealed floors, oily/greasy floors, painted concrete, and drains and open areas. All of these floor conditions require different levels of floor preparation.

Continue reading

How To: Step by Step Making a Magnetic Drip Tray

Pictured: Update International DTS-419 Rectangular Stainless Steel Drip Tray, 19 by 4-Inch – via Amazon

Step by Step instructions for making a magnetic drip try for your Kegerator or Keezer

By: HBF Reader Andrew Cunje

Materials:

  • 19″ Drip Tray – via Amazon
  • 4′ of 6x.5 Poplar Wood (actual width is 5.5″)
  • 1’4″ of  6×1 Poplar Wood (actual width is 5.5″) Note: A thicker wood will suffice for this…remember the longer the wood extends down from the joint, the less likely the magnetic bond will break from the leverage applied to the edge of the drip tray.)
  • 4-5ft of Decorative Trim of your choice (Sold in lengths of 8′)
  • MUST BE 1.25-1.5 inch trim. I used 1.5 which I highly recommend.
  • 3/4″ mounting screws (for magnets) or Epoxy/Gorilla Glue
  • 1″ wood screws
  • Brad/Finishing Nails
  • 1 large old skewl hard drive magnets (Bigger with Mounting Holes than newer drives) (Alternative: rare earth neodymium magnets that are .5″ thick (Approximately 8); these can be stacked if you can only find .25″ magnets)
  • Wood Glue
  • Wood Putty (Optional)
  • Wood Stain (Optional)
  • Tennis Racket Grip Tap (Or an old yellow rubber glove). Anything rubbery and tacky to increase friction against the fridge.

Continue reading

Toasting your own Wood Chips by Matt Del Fiacco

Special Thanks to Matt Del Fiacco for this special Guest Post!  Find a link to Matt’s website at the end of this article.

Home Toasting DIY Wood Homebrewing

Toasting your own Wood Chips

by Matt Del Fiacco

Like many new brewers, when I first started brewing I was eager to find interesting ingredients I could use, from Sriracha (bad idea) to vanilla beans (used 2 beans per gallon, terrible plan). Around this time, I tried my first bourbon-barrel stout, and feel in love with the wood characters of the beer. Wood-aged beer quickly became a passion, but the desire to experiment was still there. I noticed early on that at my local homebrew shop, all of my options were Oak of some kind, but what about Maple? What about Mesquite?

This article is about toasting your own wood so you can use it in your homebrew, no matter the source or the type. Not all wood is suitable for brewing (soft-woods, chemically treated wood, etc.), so be sure to do your research. For this article, let’s stick to commercially available smoking-wood, which is often untreated and is safe for use in cooking. In addition, this article is about chips primarily, simply because (as smoking chips) they are widely commercially available.

The point of this short article isn’t to be comprehensive or absolute, but to help you get started on dialing in your wood additions so you can adjust to your system and palate. I’m happy to hear any criticisms or ideas you may have!

Toasts of Wood
Before we go into the different types of woods, their toasts, and the flavors that can develop, we need to understand the varying toasts of wood and how toasting temperatures develop different characteristics.

Continue reading

Feeding Glass Rinser w/Carbonated Star San

Drip tray glass rinser assembly via Adventures in Homebrewing.  Stainless construction.  Rinsing the glass chills it and helps your beer pour better.  Compare at Micromatic – similar, although I’m not sure it’s identical.

Tip from HBF Reader [8 Ways to Connect with HBF] Timur:

“I just added the AIH Drip Tray Glass Rinser to my jockey box cover and fed carbonated starsan through it at a beer festival and it was a smashing success…

I included a picture of it before we went out to the festival. I just wish I had gotten that price”

This is an ingenious idea.  It addresses the basic problem of installing this, getting water to it.  Thanks Timur!

Glass Rinser Assembly for Drip Tray

Also: Kegerator Tips & Gear | Keg Repair Part #s | Recent Keg Finds

Our Top Draft Resources

 

Also: Check out AIH Sale Items – Selection Changes Regularly

Pinned:  Amazon HoliDeals Sale  –  Submit a Tip  –  If you see anything homebrew related 

More: Recent AIH Finds

 

guestpost:aihrinser

Making a Fermentation Heater w/Heat Tape

Thanks to HBF Reader Charles for this guest post!  [8 Ways to Connect with HBF]

You often have posts about deals on Fermwrap style heaters. I’d like to alert your readers about an option that is lower cost and I believe superior to any deals I have ever seen posted. Most Fermwraps are made with Flexwatt heater tape. Another brand of heat tape is THG Heat Tape, which I have seen people post on both reptile and brewing forums as being superior to Flexwatt; I have both and find it to be more durable. Regardless, Pangea Reptile sells the 12″ tape for $3/foot. They also sell the cord and connecting clips and will install it for only $4.99 more. They offer flat-rate shipping of only $4.99, so even if you order only one 12×24 wrap, it’s only $15.98 shipped. If you order more, or make one from smaller width tape, available in 3, 4, 6, or 12″, then the savings are even more. For instance, I ordered 5′ of tape and had them make two 30″ wraps, which gives more uniform coverage around a typical fermenter. Of course, you can DIY the cord if absolute lowest cost is important.

Note: This is a DIY project.  Make sure you choose appropriate materials for your application.  Contact manufacturer with questions.  Prices are deemed accurate as of this posting, check Pangea Reptile for up to the minute price, availability and description.

Also Consider:

Third Party Resource: This resource is part of our selection of top Third Party homebrewing resources.  Check out the entire list of resources Third Party Homebrew Resources

Pinned:  Amazon HoliDeals Sale  –  Submit a Tip  –  If you see anything homebrew related 

Recent Great Deals [view more]:


Inkbird ITC-308 – Dual Stage Digital Temperature Controller | Review | Inkbird Deals

Hands on Review: Bouncer Inline Beer Filter

Special Thanks to Jerry at AdventuresInHomebrewing.Beer for this Hands on Review

by Jerry at AdventuresInHomebrewing.Beer:

Have you ever paid attention to any of those” suggested posts” on Facebook? More often than not, I just swing right by. One did catch my attention though, it was for the Bouncer. I am glad I took the time to really check it out, and contact Tim and Doug about what looked to be a really cool product. Homebrewing is filled with gadgets, and guys find really cool ways to to fix problems we run into. The Bouncer and the Bouncer MD solve all sorts of floating issues! It is two different beer inline filters that accomplish great things! So here is my product review of the Bouncer and Bouncer MD home brew beer inline filters. If you want the cliff notes, the answer is yes….go buy it….you won’t be disappointed. Oh wait, you want more details? Read those below.
In order to use the Bouncer or the Bouncer MD, you do need to put them inline with your tubing. For the regular Bouncer, it needs to be between your bottling bucket and the bottling wand.

Continue reading

Guest Post: A Galaxy of Hops – Galaxy Hopped IPA

galaxy hopped ipa

Many thanks to Wes via Great Fermentations for this special Guest Post!  Read more about Wes below.

This month, our focus is going to be on a hop variety from the South Pacific. Even though there are a handful of hop varietals from down under and beyond, one of these has risen above others: Galaxy! Known for the fruity flavors and aromas it imparts to beer, Galaxy is a hop that you may or may not have used, but one you have most likely heard about!

Continue reading

Guest Post: Dispelling Brew in a Bag Misconceptions

biab brewing

by Rex Slagel – from www.brewinabag.com – read more about Rex below

Because the brew in a bag process is still fairly new in the USA, there is still some confusion about how to use a fabric filter in the brewing process. Some folks still call it a “method”, as if the resulting product is different than when employing a sparge to wash sugar from grain, and they also suggest its use for only single kettle BIAB, but it is currently being used by sparge brewer’s as well.

Essentially, the fabric replaces the grain bed as the filter and that alone allows many steps of the process to be modified – with the same (or better) results as traditional three vessel sparge set ups. The filter also eliminates the need for a manifold, false bottom, or braided cord. When we acknowledge the capability and apply it to filtering wort, it’s easy to understand the operational advantages of using a fabric filter.

Most writers explain that the advantages us using a bag include lower equipment expense and time savings, but that the drawbacks are lower efficiency, cloudier wort, a messy bag of grain, and the need for a larger kettle or mash tun. They also say “if you’re on a tight budget, you can still make good beer with minimal equipment”, which implies that in order to “really brew” you need to spend additional money for more equipment.

But in most of these articles, what is not generally conveyed, relative to conversion, extraction, and transfer of wort, is that there are some significant advantages compared to three vessel sparge home brewing, but that topic is another article.

This article is aimed at the sources of authority in the industry that, through lack of understanding or perhaps time to edit existing information, perpetuate misconceptions associated with using a fabric filter.

If you do some light research on the subject of “brew in a bag” and “efficiency” you can find plenty of websites that contain false statements. I’ll say in advance that I believe these articles were written using information understood to be accurate and that no one purposely set out to mislead the reader.

However, now that we have a greater understanding of how to use the bag, and proven results that contradict these writings, simple modifications to these articles should be administered. I’ll also say that I’m in favor of brewer’s doing things their way – that’s one of the inherent philosophies of home brewing! But, for those just getting into brewing, having bad information at the start is frustrating and wasteful, and bad information does not allow accurate comparison of pertinent factors.

There is inaccurate information in a number of articles on the internet, but for the sake of concise responses, and because the AHA article has more information than others, it also contains the most contradictions in one piece, I’ll use it as a reference when stating the facts we now know about using a fabric filter (or brew in a bag). The numbers beginning each point are indicative of the placement in the AHA article.

Just to be clear, this article is not meant to be derogatory and is is not aimed at the AHA. I’m a big fan of the organization. They have helped advance homebrewing in a professional consistent manner and lead the way as an information resource.

The following bold text is directly from the AHA’s pdf article on BIAB. My comments follow.

1. “Because of the simplicity of the process and equipment, BIAB has become a popular means of all-grain brewing for homebrewers new to mashing, living in small confines, pinching pennies, or brewing small batches.” ( true – but there are brewers using a fabric filter in fifty-five gallon barrels as well. Better stated “…for homebrewers of nearly any batch volume.”

2.“The ideal BIAB bag will be able to fit around the circumference of the boil kettle ***while not resting on the bottom to prevent scorching and will retain most of the grain sediment so as not to have too many solids left for the boil.” ( Sizing statement regarding circumference is correct, but “not resting on the bottom to prevent scorching” is not correct using confirmed procedures. There is a myth that maintaining exact mash temp for the entirety of the mash is critical for the homebrewer and the language “scorching” implies the need to fire up with the bag in the kettle to maintain temperature.

When properly insulated the kettle mash temperature will only drop about 2º over 60 minutes – which equates to about half a degree every fifteen minutes – and we all know that the majority of conversion occurs inside of thirty minutes, and if the mash is within conversion temp range this loss is inconsequential. Secondly, the bag will not melt [HBF editorial note – Rex is speaking specifically of The Brew Bag] or scorch at boiling temps – however, when firing up with the bag full of grain in place, the space between the bag and the bottom superheats and causes the sugars and the material to burn. You can watch a short video here of the material being held to the bottom of a pan while it’s on the flame boiling. Thirdly, the openings in Voile (the most commonly used material for bags) are ~ .0083” – while grain mills are set between .020 and .045 – so grain sediment in the boil is null.

3. “Squeezing is not recommended.” ( actually totally not true. Another myth is that squeezing the mash bag will extract tannins and also make the wort cloudy. Squeezing the bag of grain and tannins are not synonymous. Excerpted and paraphrased from the books “Water – A Comprehensive Guide for Brewers” and “Malt – A Practical Guide From Field to Brewhouse”: Tannins, a subset of polyphenols, are present in grain husks and cell walls. They are released at mash temps and bind with proteins to form haze. In conjunction with a pH above 6, excess tannins are extracted and impart an astringent flavor – they cannot be produced by pressure.

4. “One of the biggest downsides to brew in a bag is the efficiency compared to fly or batch sparging in a mash tun. It is not uncommon to have efficiencies in the 50-60 percentile.” ( again, totally not true, although, not mashing at proper WTGR (Water to Grain Ratio) or over-sparging will produce low numbers, but that’s the case with any method. They do offer offer some hope for other brewer’s following the above sentence. “That being said, many BIABers are achieving efficiencies comparable to the traditional forms of mashing in the 70-80 percentile.”

5. “Run your grains through the mill twice.” ( of little value unless the mill is adjusted down, and if the mill is adjustable, why not just lower the setting and run once. You can confirm this information by listening to or reading from a presentation at the AHA in 2014 by Jennifer Helber here.

6. “Increase mash rest duration. Some homebrewers have found longer mash durations allow for more conversion and ultimately higher efficiency.” ( conversion is a finite process, and as stated the same logic applies to any mash not just BIAB. Duration of the mash does impact conversion – but only to the degree that there is available starch to convert. Regarding higher efficiency, what generally happens is the brewer does not test conversion at regular intervals and does not control the results. So they may have a low reading on a brew and then the next brew using different grains, WTGR, and temperature – they rest longer, see an improvement and then state that a longer mash time produced higher conversion. For more infomation on this subject you can go to Braukaiser.com

7. “Sparge. Sparging is one of the best ways to ensure all the sugars have been rinsed out of the mashed grains.” ( not true, normal sparging techniques are not going to “ensure all the sugars have been rinsed out of the grains”. Even if that were the case due to possible excess tannin extractions, we would not want to achieve 100% efficiency. The fact of the matter is sparging is not necessary to achieve good efficiency. BIAB brewers can achieve as good or better efficiency vs brewers that sparge.

Remember that when using the grain bed as the filter and any other type of pick up or manifold the opportunity for a stuck sparge exists. When using a fabric filter – you’re using a true filter, so there is no need to “set the bed” with a coarse grind and there is no thought of a stuck sparge. Before the fabric filter, brewing processes were built around the avoidance of the stuck sparge and could not be optimized for efficiency!

8. “Calculate recipes with a lower expected efficiency. This will allow an increased grain bill to make up for any shortcomings due to low efficiency.” ( not true, in fact the opposite is true, but your processes will determine the outcome for your system. But you can count on a finer grist aiding conversion and efficiency. I have personally experienced lower grain bills and higher efficiencies, many in the upper 80’s and one in the low 90’s.

Also from RexBrew In a Bag – Bag Material – Does it Matter?

About the author: Rex Slagel is the founding member of Brew In A Bag Supplies LLC. in Plainfield, IL which manufactures The Brew Bag®. He has brewed over one hundred batches, including over sixty using a fabric filter. He can be reached at rex@brewinabag.com

Third Party Resource: This resource is part of our selection of top Third Party homebrewing resources.  Check out the entire list of resources Third Party Homebrew Resources

Pinned:  Amazon HoliDeals Sale  –  Submit a Tip  –  If you see anything homebrew related 

Recent Great Deals [view more]:

Guest Post: Brew In a Bag – Bag Material – Does it Matter? by Rex Slagel + 10% Off

Brew in a Bag Homebrew Bag MaterialSpecial Thanks to Rex Slagel for this Guest Post!  Read more about Rex below


10% Off Site-Wide.  Rex is offering 10% Off Site-Wide for readers of this article.  That includes the full lineup of ready made Brew Bags, custom made Brew Bags, Pulleys and accessories.  Use promo code FET8AD1SDR4S to get the discount – visit brewinabag.com


Continue reading

Toasting your own Wood Chips by Matt Del Fiacco

Special Thanks to Matt Del Fiacco for this special Guest Post!  Find a link to Matt’s website at the end of this article.

Home Toasting DIY Wood Homebrewing

Toasting your own Wood Chips

by Matt Del Fiacco

Like many new brewers, when I first started brewing I was eager to find interesting ingredients I could use, from Sriracha (bad idea) to vanilla beans (used 2 beans per gallon, terrible plan). Around this time, I tried my first bourbon-barrel stout, and feel in love with the wood characters of the beer. Wood-aged beer quickly became a passion, but the desire to experiment was still there. I noticed early on that at my local homebrew shop, all of my options were Oak of some kind, but what about Maple? What about Mesquite?

This article is about toasting your own wood so you can use it in your homebrew, no matter the source or the type. Not all wood is suitable for brewing (soft-woods, chemically treated wood, etc.), so be sure to do your research. For this article, let’s stick to commercially available smoking-wood, which is often untreated and is safe for use in cooking. In addition, this article is about chips primarily, simply because (as smoking chips) they are widely commercially available.

The point of this short article isn’t to be comprehensive or absolute, but to help you get started on dialing in your wood additions so you can adjust to your system and palate. I’m happy to hear any criticisms or ideas you may have!

Toasts of Wood
Before we go into the different types of woods, their toasts, and the flavors that can develop, we need to understand the varying toasts of wood and how toasting temperatures develop different characteristics.

Light toasts are typically toasted at a low temperature for a longer period of time. This breaks down tannins and hemicellulose, and facilitates the formation of vanillin, the chemical compound from lignin that is responsible for the vanilla flavors and aroma. Typically, smoky flavors are not present in light toasts, and wood flavors, along with vanilla, are prevalent.

Medium toasts are toasted at a moderate temperature for a long period of time, which avoids harshly charring the wood and focuses primarily on the breakdown of hemicellulose, resulting in the carmelization of sugars. This toast produces toasty, sweet, caramel, and maple flavors with hints of vanilla.

Heavy toasts are often the result of a two-step process. First, the wood is heated briefly at a high temperature, resulting in a strong surface toast that will impart smoky flavors. After that, there is often a medium toast for a slightly longer period of time which creates a deeper toast, penetrating the wood more fully and allowing for more complex flavors to develop. Some vanilla flavors may be present but the flavor and aroma are typically dominated by smoky, roasty, coffee like flavors balanced with notes similar to those present in a medium toast.

World Cooperage Wood Toast

This diagram was created by World Cooperage as a visual way of explaining heat’s effects on wood, in this case American Oak, and the characteristics that develop at various temperatures. The actual temperatures for (and presence of) particular flavors will vary depending on the levels of cellulose, hemicellulose, tannins, and lignin in the wood, so this chart won’t be across the board correct. However, the chart is a good rule of thumb and illustrates the temperature’s influence on wood well.

Different Types of Wood
Now that we know what characteristics can develop at certain temperatures, let’s look at the different woods and the different characters between them. Personally, I only have experience with Oak, Cherry, and Hard Maple, but this article from the September/October 2012 issue of Zymurgy[1] contains an article noting the specific tastes of particular woods in a blonde ale, and their experiences are consistent with my own.

Cherry: Dried cherry, earthy, additional sweetness in finish, light vanilla, fried bread. Phenols muted, alcohol persists, slight tannic astringency.

Hickory: Light woodsy character, light hay-like aroma, slight honey-sweetness. Phenols not muted, slight tannic astringency, alcohol softened.

Hard Maple: Woody aroma, maple-syrup character lingers in finish, light nutmeg. Had a thinning effect on body, alcohol subdued.

Soft Maple: Caramel, yellow cake, light pear-like esters, maple sap (rather than syrup). Phenols and alcohol only lightly subdued, thinning effect on body.

Red Oak: Red berries, woodsy, peppery, resinous. An authoritative and dominating wood. Alcohol and phenols heavily subdued slight oil contribution to mouthfeel.

White Oak: Soft esters (orange, pear), chardonnay-like, light earthy and spicy (peppery). Moderate repression of alcohol and phenolics.

White Ash: Light dried fruit (plum, pear), breadiness, lingering wood sweetness on finish. Alcohol and phenols subdued, considerable creaminess and smoothness contributed to base beer.

Yellow Birch: Toasted marshmallow, caramel, wood aromatics strongly reminiscent of base wood varietal, aroma considerately more prominent than flavor. Not effective at subduing alcohol and phenols, moderately tannic.

Using this information as a guideline, combined with the chart above, we can determine what flavors we want and estimate what temperature to toast the wood at. For example, White Ash has a lingering wood-y sweetness. In Oak, that would mean that toasting around 300° Fahrenheit would be ideal for accentuating sweetness. It’s not perfect, but it is a great place to start. Experiment, take consistent notes, and dial in the temperatures and woods you like.

Toasting the Wood
Last year, the blog Homebrew Dad ran a short contest to give away some yeast cultivated from the famous Heady Topper. The contest was to submit a creative recipe that you would use the yeast in, and I had the idea for a Cherry Wood IPA. I didn’t end up winning the contest, but I did have a recipe that I was really excited about, and so I set out to brew it anyways. It turned out well, but I learned quite a bit along the way, and so I’m going to take another shot at it.

I bought Cherry smoking-wood chips from my local Walmart after calling the company and ensuring no chemicals were added to the wood. For this recipe, I wanted hints of vanilla while complimenting the naturally sweeter, earthy characteristics of the wood, and so using the chart above as a guideline I decided to toast at about 350° Fahrenheit. Since I’m using chips, the toasting process will be fairly quick and I set a timer for one hour, checking the chips every fifteen minutes

First, I preheated the oven to my desired temperature, then covered a cookie sheet in aluminum foil. I then spread five ounces of Cherry wood evenly across the sheet. Pre-toasted, the wood looked like this:

Pre-Toasted Wood

I put the wood on the middle rack of the oven and set my timer for an hour. Less than five minutes in, the kitchen has a great wood smell which, by the thirty minute mark, developed a characteristic I can only describe as “harsh”.

After the hour was up, I had five ounces of medium-toast Cherry woodchips, which looked like this:

Home Toasting DIY Wood Homebrewing

So, the quick and dirty steps to toasting your own wood:

  1. Determine the type of wood and temperature you want.
  2. Pre-heat the oven to your desired temperature.
  3. Cover a cookie sheet in aluminum foil and then evenly spread your wood additions across the sheet.
  4. Put the wood in the oven on the middle rack.
  5. Set your timer for an hour, check on the wood every fifteen minutes or so.
  6. Take the wood out of the oven after an hour, toast longer if desired.
  7. Allow the wood to cool, and add it to your beer using your preferred method.

Preparing to add the Wood
How you add the wood to your homebrew is up to you. Personally, I prefer adding the wood straight to the beer after a ten minute boil. The boil will help fight off any chance of infection and will help reduce some of the tannic astringency that can come from the wood.

Cherry Wood IPA

Wood chips tend to be a bit one-dimensional in flavor contributions, and due to a high surface-area to volume ratio they impart their flavors fairly quickly. For a five gallon batch, I typically recommend about half an ounce of chips for one week. This is obviously very dependent on the beer’s style, the wood, the toast, and the flavors you’re looking for. For my IPA, the half-ounce for a week was more than enough to impart a strong wood-flavor to the beer, a bit of vanilla, but none of the dried earthy characters I was hoping for.

Another popular method is the use of a tincture, soaking the chips in alcohol (usually vodka or bourbon) for a few weeks to extract the flavor, and then adding that liquid at bottling, tasting as you go. This is a useful method for chips, since the flavors they impart tend to be a bit one-dimensional anyways, adding just the liquid and tasting is a good way to add a layer of flavor and aroma to your brew. If you’re looking for complexity, I would recommend using cubes and adding them as a straight addition.

None of this information is beyond question, and like I said in the introduction to the article the purpose isn’t to be definitive or absolute, only to introduce you to the variety of woods that can be used and how you can treat them yourself. Experiment and dial in your methods to your palate and system. Feel free to comment here or email me with questions, comments, or criticism, and I would love to hear about your experiences using wood!

Happy homebrewing!

Matt

Matt is a homebrewer with a passion for community, high gravities, and wood-aged beers. Check him and his other work out at his blog To Brew a Beer!

[1] Batcheller, David. “Wood’s Wild Side”. Zymurgy. American Homebrewing Association. October, 2012. Print.

Third Party Resource: This resource is part of our selection of top Third Party homebrewing resources.  Check out the entire list of resources Third Party Homebrew Resources

Pinned:  Amazon HoliDeals Sale  –  Submit a Tip  –  If you see anything homebrew related 

Recent Great Deals [view more]: