Category Archives: My Kegerator

Update: Kegerator Beer Line Temperatures & Reducing Foam with a Recirculating Fan

I have what I would call a reasonably well put together and balanced kegerator.  In spite of that, for years, I have dealt with the dreaded first foamy pint of beer.  After that, the beer pours great.  That is until a significant delay between pours – overnight or a few hours..

The cause of the problem is pretty clear.  Heat rises.  That means the top of your kegerator is going to be warmer than the bottom of your kegerator.  That warmer beer foams when it comes out.  The faucet and shank are also warmer.  That warmth adds to the problem.

How much is the temperature variance?  Of course, this will vary from setup to setup and climate to climate.  I was relatively shocked by the temperature difference in my own kegerator.

img_temps

The top reading about mid keg and the bottom reading is the top the top of my beer lines.  These are about 22″ apart.  This graph shows a point in time variance between the two of 14.9 degrees F.   My beer is about the temperature I want it, but the top of my serving line is much warmer.  That difference in temperature causes the first pint to have too much foam.  Pours that happen soon after the first are fine.  The tubing, shank and beer are relatively cool.

cln_img_5476The setup.  I have two temperature probes in my kegerator.  One is zip-tied to the top of a beverage line.  The other is zip-tied to a can of beer.  That’s how I have kept the probe in my kegerator for a long time with the thinking that the mass of the can of beer will help to stabilize temperature readings and give overall stable and accurate readings.  That can is sitting on the compressor hump of my Kenmore Deep Freeze (8.8 Cu ft Model 16932, out of production).  That puts it about mid keg.

cln_img_5457I placed the fan on my CO2 tank, leaning up against a keg.  Yes, you will notice that there’s no beer in the keg.  That keg was formerly filled with 1 Hr IPA and I’m sad it’s gone.  More Beer’s M-80 IPA is in the fermenter now, with RiteBrew’s Amarillo HopBurst on deck.

61hCqLgiTAL__SL1500_I used AC Infinity’s Pre-Wired LS8038A-X 115 Volt AC Fan, because it is reasonably priced, gets great reviews and it’s already setup to use AC.  I will say… My guess is that the manufacturer would not recommend this application.  If you decide to do something similar, proceed as you see fit.  I’m only telling you what I am doing myself.

Results…

img_kegerator

This graph illustrates the effects of adding the recirculation fan inside of my kegerator.  Prior to the fan, the tubing temperature spiked to around 55.4 deg F.  After the deep freeze kicked on, the tubing dropped to around 53.15 deg F.  Not a big change.  That averages out to 54.275 deg F.

You can see the point in this graph where the fan is turned on.  The temperature drops sharply.  The new is high 47.3 deg F and the new low is 42.13 deg F for an average of 44.715 deg F.

Before – Avg Tubing Temp = 54.275, Avg Mid Keg Temp = 38.83, Dif = 15.445 deg F

After – Avg Tubing Temp = 44.715, Avg Mid Keg Temp = 38.89, Dif = 5.825 deg F

The recirculation fan dropped my tubing temperature by 9.62 deg F (62%).  Practically speaking, that difference is enough to make every pint pour right.  My first pint pours correctly… I like that!

More photos…

cln_img_5467A look down.  You can see my Eva Dry E-500 (Hands on Review) standing by taking care of condensation.  I’ve heard from others that a recirculation fan makes the Eva Dry work even better.  My kegerator has remained dry (with the help of the Eva Dry) since installing the fan.

cln_img_5480A look down my collar.  As you can see, I’m no wood worker.  Having said that, I spent a lot of time working on the fit and finish of this collar.  The end result was good.  If you let the deep freeze door fall shut the resulting noise, sounds like a factory seal sort of thump.  I did put weather stripping on the bottom to seal between the collar and the deep freeze.  Adding insulation to the collar would, presumably, also help maintain temperatures and reduce foaming.

Reader Feedback:  Google+ Friend Justin Says: “I use the same fan in my keezer and it works great.”

img_purchdateUpdate: As of July 2015 my same fan continues to work great.  It has been running continuously in my kegerator for over a year straight.

AC Infinity LS8038A-X Standard Cooling Fan, 115V AC 80mm by 80mm by 38mm Low Speed

Related: Tips & Gear for your Kegerator · Balancing Your Draft System · Temp Probe Placement

Pinned: $128:Brew Stand · $7:Spoon · Hops Sale · Pin Locks · 16 Gallon Kettle

Stock Up: Great Grain Sale – Specialty and Base Grains

More Amazon Finds:

toppost:recircfan

Hands On: Brand New, 5 Gallon Keg from AIH

Adventures in Homebrewing Keg

A while back Adventures in Homebrewing introduced brand new 5 gallon ball lock keg made to their specifications.  It’s marked down to… $75.  That’s a stellar deal for a brand new ball lock,  I purchased one to give it a try.

Ball Lock, Stainless Steel, Double Rubber Handles.  Specs say these are 25″ tall and 8.5″ in diameter.  NSF and ISO 9001 Certified.

Adventures in Homebrewing Keg ReviewA look at the top of the keg.  This is a double handle rubber top and rubber bottom keg.  This designed is generally preferred to single handle strap designs as it’s easier to carry, stackable and the two handles mean the keg can be inverted for draining after cleaning or sanitizing.

Adventures in Homebrewing Keg ReviewStamp on the side of the side of the keg reads… Max WP 130 PSI [900 kpa], Cap 5 US GAL [19].  Guessing WP = working pressure,

AIH New 5 Gallon Corny Keg Ball LockMy keg came from the first batch that was in the process of being NSF certified.  Since then that process has been completed.  This photo (stock image from AIH) shows NSF and ISO 9001 certification stamps.

Adventures in Homebrewing Keg ReviewBottom of the keg

Adventures in Homebrewing Keg ReviewThere was a little bit of what I would call rubber residue.  Not a lot, but some.  Guessing this will wear or scrub off.  Maybe this is common for brand new kegs, I’ve never owned one before this.

Adventures in Homebrewing Ball Lock KegfInside of the keg.  Looks great.

Adventures in Homebrewing Ball Lock Keg PartsParts and pieces.  Left side is liquid, right side is gas.  The lid oring is white.  If I had to guess, I’d say it’s a white silicone.  It doesn’t feel like Buna-N.

Adventures in Homebrewing Ball Lock KegLiquid dip tube

Adventures in Homebrewing Ball Lock KegfClose up on the gas side

Adventures in Homebrewing Ball Lock KegfThe keg uses universal style poppets.

Adventures in Homebrewing Ball Lock KegClose up of the lid.Homebrew keg reviewKegging a Pale AleNew Ball Lock Homebrew KegPressurized, sealed up and sprayed down with Star San to check for leaks.  No leaks in sight.Adventures in Homebrew Ball LockIn my kegerator

I’ve had this keg since January of 2015.  This is the nicest 5 gallon keg I’ve owned.  It’s high quality, looks great and works great.  Their quality rivals my Cornelius-type brand kegs and (since all my other 5 gallon kegs are used) the condition of this keg is superior.  I’m also glad AIH went to the time and expense to get it NSF certified.

At it’s current sale price of $75, I’d call it a stellar value.  Shipping is additional.  Play around with different quantities as minimum shipping charges make those costs a bit odd.  It usually doesn’t cost much more to ship a second, third or fourth keg.

From  Facebook Friend Michael… “Have one from their Black Friday sale and am very happy with it. It’s a Steal!”

AIH New 5 Gallon Corny Keg Ball Lock – $75!

These are also available in a 2.5 gallon version.  Although 2.5 gallon kegs are smaller, they generally sell for more than their 5 gallon counterparts.  AIH has these on sale for $75 too.  The smaller size is good for splitting 5 gallon batches, small batch or small space brewing/kegging and easily taking your homebrew on the go…

AIH New Double Rubber Handle 2.5 Gal Keg – $75!

Related: Tips and Gear for your Kegerator · Balancing Your Draft System

Pinned: $128:Brew Stand · $7:Spoon · Hops Sale · Pin Locks · 16 Gallon Kettle

Stock Up: Great Grain Sale – Specialty and Base Grains

Also from AIH… over 70 sale items including Perlick Faucets, Deals on kegs – new and used, pin lock and ball lock, recipe kits, kettles, pumps, jockey boxes, grain mill, taps, tower

Pinned: $128:Brew Stand · $7:Spoon · Hops Sale · Pin Locks · 16 Gallon Kettle

Stock Up: Great Grain Sale – Specialty and Base Grains

Hands On: Eva Dry E-500 with Kegerator Condensation Trial

eva dry 500 kegerator condensation review

I have a converted chest freezer kegerator that (years ago) was building up with condensation.  Literally, standing water.  At that point, I had not added a collar, so it’s not like it was a major air leak.  The seal was factory tight.

I looked for solutions and finally settled on the  Eva-dry E-500.  This uses a renewable desiccant material.

The beads inside this unit absorb moisture.  As they do that they change color.  When they have gone from blue to pink, you know it’s time to “renew” the unit.  This is done by removing it from the kegerator and plugging it into an outlet.  The integrated heating element drives off any built up moisture.  When the beads turn blue (overnight), you’re ready to go.  I don’t have to do this often, usually every couple months.

Back of the Eva Dry E-500

Absorbs Excess Moisture.  No batteries or wires required.  Easily regenerated.  No messy spills or refills.  Environmentally safe.  100% renewable.  Ultra space saving.

CE and UL Listed

Bottom of the unit.  This flips out when it’s time to recharge.  It lays flat during normal operation.

Close up on the freshly recharged desiccant beads

Stock photo

Trial:
I recharged this unit on June 22.  I’ve known that this works, but I wanted to put some numbers to it.  Pictures and testing were completed in my collared deep freezer based kegerator.

I checked this around once per week.  Here is a picture of what I would call the first significant signs of moisture build up.  This was taken on August 10th.  That’s 49 days into the test.

Here’s what the beads looked like on August 10th.  The beads are what I would call and translucent pink-ish.  I left the unit in place for another week to see what would happen with moisture content.  It predictability… continued to get worse.  On the 18th, I recharged the unit and wiped down the inside of my kegerator to test conditions without the Eva Dry in place.

This picture was taken 8 days later at my first weekly test.  This is what I would call a similar level of moisture after only 8 days vs 49 days with the Eva Dry.  I have no doubt that water would end up pooling in the bottom of my kegerator, in relatively short order, without the Eva Dry in place.

I took the final weight of these on 8-17.  My Escali Primo has it coming in at 876 grams.

And again the next day after recharging.  It came in at 772 grams.  A full 104 grams of water was driven off during recharging.

Using my Top Find Fast Weigh MS-500-BLK I measured out right at 104 grams.  I used the tare feature so this is actually 104 grams of water.  It nearly fills a taster glass.  This represents what the Eva Dry absorbed.

I’ve had this same unit since October of 2008.  This trial took place around August of 2013.  As of this edit (March 2015), this unit is about 6 and 1/2 years old.  Other than a slightly curling label, this looks like new and it certainly works like new.

The Eva-Dry E-500 has kept my kegerator dry for years.  It is a Top Find and I’m glad to have it!

Eva-dry E-500 Renewable Wireless Mini Dehumidifer

This is a Top Find!

Also Consider: Lightning Deals

Pinned: $128:Brew Stand · $7:Spoon · Hops Sale · Pin Locks · 16 Gallon Kettle

Stock Up: Great Grain Sale – Specialty and Base Grains

Recent Amazon Finds:

review:evadry500

Update: Building a Recirculating Draft Line Cleaning Pump

Recirculating Kegerator Draft Line Cleaning Pump

The directions on most line cleaners call for recirculating the cleaner for some period of time.  Most cleaning kits that are out there include a hand pump operating one of these for 15 to 30 minutes, for each faucet, doesn’t sound fun.

To really clean your draft lines, you need to keep solution flowing for a length of time, not just fill and wait.  Initially I tried to clean my system by pushing line cleaner out of a keg.  This was a waste of CO2.  I also found it tough to keep solution running slowly enough to get enough contact time.  It’s easy to quickly push a cleaning or sanitizing solution through your system under CO2 pressure, but I found it to be a pain to try to do so slowly.  This also requires quite a bit of cleaning solution versus a recirculating pump.

I decided to put together a recirculating draft line cleaning pump setup.

First I needed a pump.  I have a utility pump that I use for various tasks around brewery.  I decided that that pump was too powerful.  I didn’t want to deal with foaming issues that I thought may be caused by the high flow this pump would produce.  I wanted something with less power that could slowly circulate liquid through draft lines.

After looking around, I settled on the EcoPlus-132 Submersible Pump.

EcoPlus Submersible Pump - 132 gph - 4.3 ft. max - 9W - 3/8 in. ID

It’s variable speed, submersible and it has a number of included barb sizes including a 3/8″.

EcoPlus Submersible Pump – 132 gph – 4.3 ft. max – 9W – 3/8 in. ID

Note that the current picture shows a slightly different pump from the one I have.  My guess is that that this is a stock image issue and that the current pump looks just like my pump.  Either way it doesn’t really matter as long as it functions the same way and has the same specs.

I picked up the rest of the fittings from Midwest Supplies.

Liquid Post
Standard liquid post to attach the pump to your draft line quick disconnects.  You may already have an extra one of these around.

Cornelius Plug Adapter – 1/4″ MPT
The liquid post screws into this.

3/8″ Barbed to 1/4″ FPT Elbow
Put some teflon tape on the MPT side of the Cornelius plug adapter and attach this FPT elbow to it.  Note: The design has changed on this just slightly since I put mine together.  Just a slightly different look.

This basically gives you a Corny keg quick disconnect post to 3/8″ barb converter.

Now you’ll attach a length of 3/8″ ID tubing to this followed by the included 3/8″ pump adapter.  As far as sizing the length of 3/8″, use enough tubing to allow your draft lines to reach the bottom of a bucket you will use for reservoir liquid.

Assembled

The only thing that’s left is routing the faucet discharge back to the recirculation bucket. I’ve found 1/2″ ID Silicone tubing works great for this. The size is perfect and the silicone is stretchy enough to easily fit on the faucet. It is a bit pricey, but you really only need a few feet of it, just enough to get from the faucet down to the reservoir bucket. I’m guessing any 1/2″ ID tubing would also work for this, but I can’t attest to it from experience.

This design cleans your whole draft system:
This design cleans the faucet, the shank, the quick disconnect and the tubing.  Some designs that I’ve seen have you removing the beer nut and placing the hand pump apparatus directly on the shank.  That’s some work disassembling and reassembling and it also skips the line and quick disconnect.

BLC solution after cleaning all of my faucets.  Umm… they needed cleaned I guess.  I recirculated for 15 to 20 minutes per faucet.

 Recirculating rinse water

Recirculating Star San

Pump and connection assembly

Flow Rate:
As I stated I wanted a slow, steady flow of solution.  Here’s a video illustrating what kind of flow I’m getting with 7′ of draft line.  The 132 gallon per hour pump is working great for me.

If you want a higher flow rate, I suggest moving up to next largest pump in this line.

EcoPlus 185 Submersible Pump, 185 GPH

According to the specs on that pump, that pump also has an included 3/8″ barb.

Also consider picking up some Beer Line Cleaner (BLC)….

BLC Line Cleaner

BLC Beer Line Cleaner 32 OZ – $10.99

Related:

Possible v2 Build…

Free shipping Stainless steel Carbonation Cap w/ 5/16" Barb, Ball Lock Type, fit soft drink PET bottles, Homebrew Kegging

 

I have sourced on of these to be used to replace all of the fittings on the ball lock side.  I have that but have yet to try it in place of the fittings outlined in this post.  Note that this ships directly from Asia, so it takes a while to arrive.

 

Free shipping Stainless steel Carbonation Cap w/ 5/16″ Barb, Ball Lock Type, fit soft drink PET bottles, Homebrew Kegging – $12.80 + Free Shipping

Pinned: $128:Brew Stand · $7:Spoon · Hops Sale · Pin Locks · 16 Gallon Kettle

Stock Up: Great Grain Sale – Specialty and Base Grains

Recent Great Deals:

toppost:draftrecirpump

Hands On: Eva Dry E-500 with Kegerator Condensation Trial

eva dry 500 kegerator condensation review

I have a converted chest freezer kegerator that (years ago) was building up with condensation.  Literally, standing water.  At that point, I had not added a collar, so it’s not like it was a major air leak.  The seal was factory tight.

I looked for solutions and finally settled on the  Eva-dry E-500.  This uses a renewable desiccant material.

The beads inside this unit absorb moisture.  As they do that they change color.  When they have gone from blue to pink, you know it’s time to “renew” the unit.  This is done by removing it from the kegerator and plugging it into an outlet.  The integrated heating element drives off any built up moisture.  When the beads turn blue (overnight), you’re ready to go.  I don’t have to do this often, usually every couple months.

Back of the Eva Dry E-500

Absorbs Excess Moisture.  No batteries or wires required.  Easily regenerated.  No messy spills or refills.  Environmentally safe.  100% renewable.  Ultra space saving.

CE and UL Listed

Bottom of the unit.  This flips out when it’s time to recharge.  It lays flat during normal operation.

Close up on the freshly recharged desiccant beads

Stock photo

Trial:
I recharged this unit on June 22.  I’ve known that this works, but I wanted to put some numbers to it.  Pictures and testing were completed in my collared deep freezer based kegerator.

I checked this around once per week.  Here is a picture of what I would call the first significant signs of moisture build up.  This was taken on August 10th.  That’s 49 days into the test.

Here’s what the beads looked like on August 10th.  The beads are what I would call and translucent pink-ish.  I left the unit in place for another week to see what would happen with moisture content.  It predictability… continued to get worse.  On the 18th, I recharged the unit and wiped down the inside of my kegerator to test conditions without the Eva Dry in place.

This picture was taken 8 days later at my first weekly test.  This is what I would call a similar level of moisture after only 8 days vs 49 days with the Eva Dry.  I have no doubt that water would end up pooling in the bottom of my kegerator, in relatively short order, without the Eva Dry in place.

I took the final weight of these on 8-17.  My Escali Primo has it coming in at 876 grams.

And again the next day after recharging.  It came in at 772 grams.  A full 104 grams of water was driven off during recharging.

Using my Top Find Fast Weigh MS-500-BLK I measured out right at 104 grams.  I used the tare feature so this is actually 104 grams of water.  It nearly fills a taster glass.  This represents what the Eva Dry absorbed.

I’ve had this same unit since October of 2008.  This trial took place around August of 2013.  As of this edit (March 2015), this unit is about 6 and 1/2 years old.  Other than a slightly curling label, this looks like new and it certainly works like new.

The Eva-Dry E-500 has kept my kegerator dry for years.  It is a Top Find and I’m glad to have it!

Eva-dry E-500 Renewable Wireless Mini Dehumidifer

This is a Top Find!

Also Consider: Lightning Deals

Pinned: $128:Brew Stand · $7:Spoon · Hops Sale · Pin Locks · 16 Gallon Kettle

Stock Up: Great Grain Sale – Specialty and Base Grains

Recent Amazon Finds:

review:evadry500

Building a Recirculating Draft Line Cleaning Setup

Recirculating Kegerator Draft Line Cleaning Pump

The directions on most line cleaners call for recirculating the cleaner for some period of time.  Most cleaning kits that are out there include a hand pump operating one of these for 15 to 30 minutes, for each faucet, doesn’t sound fun.

To really clean your draft lines, you need to keep solution flowing for a length of time, not just fill and wait.  Initially I tried to clean my system by pushing line cleaner out of a keg.  This was a waste of CO2.  I also found it tough to keep solution running slowly enough to get enough contact time.  It’s easy to quickly push a cleaning or sanitizing solution through your system under CO2 pressure, but I found it to be a pain to try to do so slowly.  This also requires quite a bit of cleaning solution versus a recirculating pump.

I decided to put together a recirculating draft line cleaning pump setup.

First I needed a pump.  I have a utility pump that I use for various tasks around brewery.  I decided that that pump was too powerful.  I didn’t want to deal with foaming issues that I thought may be caused by the high flow this pump would produce.  I wanted something with less power that could slowly circulate liquid through draft lines.

After looking around, I settled on the EcoPlus-132 Submersible Pump.

EcoPlus Submersible Pump - 132 gph - 4.3 ft. max - 9W - 3/8 in. ID

It’s variable speed, submersible and it has a number of included barb sizes including a 3/8″.

EcoPlus Submersible Pump – 132 gph – 4.3 ft. max – 9W – 3/8 in. ID

Note that the current picture shows a slightly different pump from the one I have.  My guess is that that this is a stock image issue and that the current pump looks just like my pump.  Either way it doesn’t really matter as long as it functions the same way and has the same specs.

I picked up the rest of the fittings from Midwest Supplies.

Liquid Post
Standard liquid post to attach the pump to your draft line quick disconnects.  You may already have an extra one of these around.

Cornelius Plug Adapter – 1/4″ MPT
The liquid post screws into this.

3/8″ Barbed to 1/4″ FPT Elbow
Put some teflon tape on the MPT side of the Cornelius plug adapter and attach this FPT elbow to it.  Note: The design has changed on this just slightly since I put mine together.  Just a slightly different look.

This basically gives you a Corny keg quick disconnect post to 3/8″ barb converter.

Now you’ll attach a length of 3/8″ ID tubing to this followed by the included 3/8″ pump adapter.  As far as sizing the length of 3/8″, use enough tubing to allow your draft lines to reach the bottom of a bucket you will use for reservoir liquid.

Assembled

The only thing that’s left is routing the faucet discharge back to the recirculation bucket. I’ve found 1/2″ ID Silicone tubing works great for this. The size is perfect and the silicone is stretchy enough to easily fit on the faucet. It is a bit pricey, but you really only need a few feet of it, just enough to get from the faucet down to the reservoir bucket. I’m guessing any 1/2″ ID tubing would also work for this, but I can’t attest to it from experience.

This design cleans your whole draft system:
This design cleans the faucet, the shank, the quick disconnect and the tubing.  Some designs that I’ve seen have you removing the beer nut and placing the hand pump apparatus directly on the shank.  That’s some work disassembling and reassembling and it also skips the line and quick disconnect.

BLC solution after cleaning all of my faucets.  Umm… they needed cleaned I guess.  I recirculated for 15 to 20 minutes per faucet.

 Recirculating rinse water

Recirculating Star San

Pump and connection assembly

Flow Rate:
As I stated I wanted a slow, steady flow of solution.  Here’s a video illustrating what kind of flow I’m getting with 7′ of draft line.  The 132 gallon per hour pump is working great for me.

If you want a higher flow rate, I suggest moving up to next largest pump in this line.

EcoPlus 185 Submersible Pump, 185 GPH

According to the specs on that pump, that pump also has an included 3/8″ barb.

Also consider picking up some Beer Line Cleaner (BLC)….

BLC Line Cleaner

BLC Beer Line Cleaner 32 OZ – $10.99

Related:

Possible v2 Build…

Free shipping Stainless steel Carbonation Cap w/ 5/16" Barb, Ball Lock Type, fit soft drink PET bottles, Homebrew Kegging

I have sourced on of these to be used to replace all of the fittings on the ball lock side.  I have that but have yet to try it in place of the fittings outlined in this post.  Note that this ships directly from Asia, so it takes a while to arrive.

 

Free shipping Stainless steel Carbonation Cap w/ 5/16″ Barb, Ball Lock Type, fit soft drink PET bottles, Homebrew Kegging – $12.80 + Free Shipping

Pinned: $128:Brew Stand · $7:Spoon · Hops Sale · Pin Locks · 16 Gallon Kettle

Stock Up: Great Grain Sale – Specialty and Base Grains

Recent Great Deals:

toppost:draftrecirpump

Building a Simple Draft Line Flushing Setup

I use a recirculating draft line pump for cleaning my draft lines.  More information on that build – Recirculating Draft Line Cleaning Pump.  That setup has worked great for me for periodic deep cleaning.

The issue I ran into was the desire to periodically do a quick flush to clean or sanitize lines.  Two occasions in particular, first when a keg kicks.  Unless you sit there and run CO2, while beer and yeast splat out of your faucet, you’re left with some residual beer and possibly yeast and trub sitting in the line.  The second occasion is the desire to sanitize when putting a new keg on.  Although the recirculating pump works great, it is a bit of work to set it up and clean it after use.  I wanted something that I could use to quickly flush and/or sanitize lines.

I decided to come up with an easy quick line flushing setup to use in these occasions.

A 1 liter bottle acts as a liquid containment vessel.  For the cap interface, Initially I thought about using a Carbonator Cap or More Beer’s Kent Soda Bottle Cap, but eventually, I decided to go with a tire valve.

I just went to a local auto parts store to find a clamp-in style tire valve.  Similar to this.

Note: I’m not suggesting this exact part.  It may work, but I’m not sure if it will fit in a 1 or 2 L bottle cap.  I’d suggest gathering the other parts first.  Then take your cap and a small length of tubing to your local auto parts store to find something suitable.

The first thing you’re going to want to do is drill a hole in the cap so that the tire stem fits through it snugly   The tire stem should contain a rubbing oring to produce and airtight seal.  I happened to have a food safe Buna N oring around that worked well.  The clamp in tire valve will have a nut that goes on the other end of the cap to lock everything together.

You should have something like this:

The inside of the cap should look something like this:

Next you’re going to want to use a valve core removal/installation tool to remove the tire valve core.  That core functions as a one way check valve.  We’re not making a tire, so we don’t need or want that.

At this point we have a completed cap.  Next we need tubing and a mechanism to connect to draft lines.  For tubing, I found that 1/4″ ID tubing fit on my tire valve nicely. The remainder of the parts can be seen in this photo:

via Midwest Supplies:

Liquid Post – Cornelius-Spartan, Super Champion & R Kegs

Cornelius Plug Adapter-1/4″ FFL x 19/32″ 5203 – unavailable as of this update

1/4″ MFL to 1/4″ Barb S6017 – unavailable as of this update

Note: As you can see from the pictures, these parts are for a ball lock setup.  You can use the same concept for your pin lock setup.  If you do, let us know what parts you used and we’ll update this post.

Assemble those together and you’ll get this:

Connect the ball lock assembly with the cap assembly using 1/4″ ID tubing and some clamps to come up with the finished device.

I pressurized this unit and placed it on top of my kegerator, leaning up against my Bulldog Pegboard, because it’s amazing. :)

Some variations that I think would work:

  1. You could use a 2L bottle and skip the pressurization step, just squeeze to flush lines or sanitize.
  2. You could cut the bottom off of your bottle.  Hold this up in the air and pour rinsing, cleaning or sanitizing solution in.  The bottle is acting as a funnel and gravity feeds solution through your lines.
  3. You could also go with a 3L Bottle (available at a lot of dollar-type stores).  I went with a 1L size, for easy storage and also because I had it on hand.