Category Archives: My Kegerator

Update: Kegerator Beer Line Temperatures & Reducing Foam with a Recirculating Fan

I have what I would call a reasonably well put together and balanced kegerator.  In spite of that, for years, I have dealt with the dreaded first foamy pint of beer.  After that, the beer pours great.  That is until a significant delay between pours – overnight or a few hours..

The cause of the problem is pretty clear.  Heat rises.  That means the top of your kegerator is going to be warmer than the bottom of your kegerator.  That warmer beer foams when it comes out.  The faucet and shank are also warmer.  That warmth adds to the problem.

How much is the temperature variance?  Of course, this will vary from setup to setup and climate to climate.  I was relatively shocked by the temperature difference in my own kegerator.

img_temps

The top reading about mid keg and the bottom reading is the top the top of my beer lines.  These are about 22″ apart.  This graph shows a point in time variance between the two of 14.9 degrees F.   My beer is about the temperature I want it, but the top of my serving line is much warmer.  That difference in temperature causes the first pint to have too much foam.  Pours that happen soon after the first are fine.  The tubing, shank and beer are relatively cool.

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Mashed In Custom Ingredient Tap Handles!

taphandles_1024x1024

Mashed In makes beautiful custom beer tap handles from actual brewing ingredients including Hops, a variety of grains and more.

I have four of these tap handles. cln_img_0248 As you can imagine, I have a lot of beer and homebrewing gear.  My wife is very supportive of my homebrewing hobby and loves good beer – mostly hop heavy IPAs.  She even occasionally brews with me, but for the most part I get a “meh” on a scale of meh to… meh when I show her new gear.  These tap handles are a notable exception.  She thinks these are awesome and I agree.  You can see a picture of these in my recent post on brewing Big Little Guy IPA.

Look for a full review in the future, but, for now, these tap handles are marked down $5 to $34.99 (CAD).  Promo code HBFSAVE10 saves you another 10% on individual handles (does not apply to 4 handle set).  Shipping is free… worldwide.  Additional gear including Cider and Cold Brew Coffee handles as well as custom coasters are also available.

Check them out – Mashed In Custom Ingredient Tap Handles

A couple notes of clarification… 1. These are made with real brewing ingredients, whole cone hops and malted barley and 2. Prices are in CAD Canadian Dollars.  These ship from Canada worldwide at no additional cost.  Paypal is accepted and paypal will handle the USD (or whatever) to CAD exchange.

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Update: Kegerator Beer Line Temperatures & Reducing Foam with a Recirculating Fan

I have what I would call a reasonably well put together and balanced kegerator.  In spite of that, for years, I have dealt with the dreaded first foamy pint of beer.  After that, the beer pours great.  That is until a significant delay between pours – overnight or a few hours..

The cause of the problem is pretty clear.  Heat rises.  That means the top of your kegerator is going to be warmer than the bottom of your kegerator.  That warmer beer foams when it comes out.  The faucet and shank are also warmer.  That warmth adds to the problem.

How much is the temperature variance?  Of course, this will vary from setup to setup and climate to climate.  I was relatively shocked by the temperature difference in my own kegerator.

img_temps

The top reading about mid keg and the bottom reading is the top the top of my beer lines.  These are about 22″ apart.  This graph shows a point in time variance between the two of 14.9 degrees F.   My beer is about the temperature I want it, but the top of my serving line is much warmer.  That difference in temperature causes the first pint to have too much foam.  Pours that happen soon after the first are fine.  The tubing, shank and beer are relatively cool.

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Hands On: Brand New, 5 Gallon Keg from AIH

Adventures in Homebrewing Keg

A while back Adventures in Homebrewing introduced brand new 5 gallon ball lock keg made to their specifications.  It’s marked down to… $75.  That’s a stellar deal for a brand new ball lock,  I purchased one to give it a try.

Ball Lock, Stainless Steel, Double Rubber Handles.  Specs say these are 25″ tall and 8.5″ in diameter.  NSF and ISO 9001 Certified.

Adventures in Homebrewing Keg ReviewA look at the top of the keg.  This is a double handle rubber top and rubber bottom keg.  This designed is generally preferred to single handle strap designs as it’s easier to carry, stackable and the two handles mean the keg can be inverted for draining after cleaning or sanitizing.

Adventures in Homebrewing Keg ReviewStamp on the side of the side of the keg reads… Max WP 130 PSI [900 kpa], Cap 5 US GAL [19].  Guessing WP = working pressure,

AIH New 5 Gallon Corny Keg Ball LockMy keg came from the first batch that was in the process of being NSF certified.  Since then that process has been completed.  This photo (stock image from AIH) shows NSF and ISO 9001 certification stamps.

Adventures in Homebrewing Keg ReviewBottom of the keg

Adventures in Homebrewing Keg ReviewThere was a little bit of what I would call rubber residue.  Not a lot, but some.  Guessing this will wear or scrub off.  Maybe this is common for brand new kegs, I’ve never owned one before this.

Adventures in Homebrewing Ball Lock KegfInside of the keg.  Looks great.

Adventures in Homebrewing Ball Lock Keg PartsParts and pieces.  Left side is liquid, right side is gas.  The lid oring is white.  If I had to guess, I’d say it’s a white silicone.  It doesn’t feel like Buna-N.

Adventures in Homebrewing Ball Lock KegLiquid dip tube

Adventures in Homebrewing Ball Lock KegfClose up on the gas side

Adventures in Homebrewing Ball Lock KegfThe keg uses universal style poppets.

Adventures in Homebrewing Ball Lock KegClose up of the lid.Homebrew keg reviewKegging a Pale AleNew Ball Lock Homebrew KegPressurized, sealed up and sprayed down with Star San to check for leaks.  No leaks in sight.Adventures in Homebrew Ball LockIn my kegerator

I’ve had this keg since January of 2015.  This is the nicest 5 gallon keg I’ve owned.  It’s high quality, looks great and works great.  Their quality rivals my Cornelius-type brand kegs and (since all my other 5 gallon kegs are used) the condition of this keg is superior.  I’m also glad AIH went to the time and expense to get it NSF certified.

At it’s current sale price of $75, I’d call it a stellar value.  Shipping is additional.  Play around with different quantities as minimum shipping charges make those costs a bit odd.  It usually doesn’t cost much more to ship a second, third or fourth keg.

From  Facebook Friend Michael… “Have one from their Black Friday sale and am very happy with it. It’s a Steal!”

AIH New 5 Gallon Corny Keg Ball Lock – $75!

These are also available in a 2.5 gallon version.  Although 2.5 gallon kegs are smaller, they generally sell for more than their 5 gallon counterparts.  AIH has these on sale for $75 too.  The smaller size is good for splitting 5 gallon batches, small batch or small space brewing/kegging and easily taking your homebrew on the go…

AIH New Double Rubber Handle 2.5 Gal Keg – $75!

Related: Tips and Gear for your Kegerator · Balancing Your Draft System

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Also from AIH… over 70 sale items including Perlick Faucets, Deals on kegs – new and used, pin lock and ball lock, recipe kits, kettles, pumps, jockey boxes, grain mill, taps, tower

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Hands On: Eva Dry E-500 with Kegerator Condensation Trial

eva dry 500 kegerator condensation review

I have a converted chest freezer kegerator that (years ago) was building up with condensation.  Literally, standing water.  At that point, I had not added a collar, so it’s not like it was a major air leak.  The seal was factory tight.

I looked for solutions and finally settled on the  Eva-dry E-500.  This uses a renewable desiccant material.

The beads inside this unit absorb moisture.  As they do that they change color.  When they have gone from blue to pink, you know it’s time to “renew” the unit.  This is done by removing it from the kegerator and plugging it into an outlet.  The integrated heating element drives off any built up moisture.  When the beads turn blue (overnight), you’re ready to go.  I don’t have to do this often, usually every couple months.

Back of the Eva Dry E-500

Absorbs Excess Moisture.  No batteries or wires required.  Easily regenerated.  No messy spills or refills.  Environmentally safe.  100% renewable.  Ultra space saving.

CE and UL Listed

Bottom of the unit.  This flips out when it’s time to recharge.  It lays flat during normal operation.

Close up on the freshly recharged desiccant beads

Stock photo

Trial:
I recharged this unit on June 22.  I’ve known that this works, but I wanted to put some numbers to it.  Pictures and testing were completed in my collared deep freezer based kegerator.

I checked this around once per week.  Here is a picture of what I would call the first significant signs of moisture build up.  This was taken on August 10th.  That’s 49 days into the test.

Here’s what the beads looked like on August 10th.  The beads are what I would call and translucent pink-ish.  I left the unit in place for another week to see what would happen with moisture content.  It predictability… continued to get worse.  On the 18th, I recharged the unit and wiped down the inside of my kegerator to test conditions without the Eva Dry in place.

This picture was taken 8 days later at my first weekly test.  This is what I would call a similar level of moisture after only 8 days vs 49 days with the Eva Dry.  I have no doubt that water would end up pooling in the bottom of my kegerator, in relatively short order, without the Eva Dry in place.

I took the final weight of these on 8-17.  My Escali Primo has it coming in at 876 grams.

And again the next day after recharging.  It came in at 772 grams.  A full 104 grams of water was driven off during recharging.

Using my Top Find Fast Weigh MS-500-BLK I measured out right at 104 grams.  I used the tare feature so this is actually 104 grams of water.  It nearly fills a taster glass.  This represents what the Eva Dry absorbed.

I’ve had this same unit since October of 2008.  This trial took place around August of 2013.  As of this edit (March 2015), this unit is about 6 and 1/2 years old.  Other than a slightly curling label, this looks like new and it certainly works like new.

The Eva-Dry E-500 has kept my kegerator dry for years.  It is a Top Find and I’m glad to have it!

Eva-dry E-500 Renewable Wireless Mini Dehumidifer

This is a Top Find!

RelatedTips and Gear for your Kegerator · 5 Most Recent Keg Finds · Top Finds

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review:evadry500

Kegerator Beer Line Temperatures & Reducing Foam with a Recirculating Fan

I have what I would call a reasonably well put together and balanced kegerator.  In spite of that, for years, I have dealt with the dreaded first foamy pint of beer.  After that, the beer pours great.  That is until a significant delay between pours – overnight or a few hours..

The cause of the problem is pretty clear.  Heat rises.  That means the top of your kegerator is going to be warmer than the bottom of your kegerator.  That warmer beer foams when it comes out.  The faucet and shank are also warmer.  That warmth adds to the problem.

How much is the temperature variance?  Of course, this will vary from setup to setup and climate to climate.  I was relatively shocked by the temperature difference in my own kegerator.

img_temps

The top reading about mid keg and the bottom reading is the top the top of my beer lines.  These are about 22″ apart.  This graph shows a point in time variance between the two of 14.9 degrees F.   My beer is about the temperature I want it, but the top of my serving line is much warmer.  That difference in temperature causes the first pint to have too much foam.  Pours that happen soon after the first are fine.  The tubing, shank and beer are relatively cool.

Continue reading