Category Archives: Projects

Update: Building a Recirculating Draft Line Cleaning Pump

Update: The elbow I use in this build has been out of stock for a long time.  It’s back in stock today.  I sourced everything for this build, other than the pump, from Midwest Supplies.  I’m aware of two Midwest Supplies Promos going on right now that you could use in conjunction with an order… Free $25 Gift Certificate at Midwest + Free Shipping – Includes Carboys


The directions on most line cleaners call for recirculating the cleaner for some period of time.  Most cleaning kits that are out there include a hand pump operating one of these for 15 to 30 minutes, for each faucet, doesn’t sound fun.

To really clean your draft lines, you need to keep solution flowing for a length of time, not just fill and wait.  Initially I tried to clean my system by pushing line cleaner out of a keg.  This was a waste of CO2.  I also found it tough to keep solution running slowly enough to get enough contact time.  It’s easy to quickly push a cleaning or sanitizing solution through your system under CO2 pressure, but I found it to be a pain to try to do so slowly.  This also requires quite a bit of cleaning solution versus a recirculating pump.

I decided to put together a recirculating draft line cleaning pump setup.

First I needed a pump.  I have a utility pump that I use for various tasks around brewery.  I decided that that pump was too powerful.  I didn’t want to deal with foaming issues that I thought may be caused by the high flow this pump would produce.  I wanted something with less power that could slowly circulate liquid through draft lines.

After looking around, I settled on the EcoPlus-132 fountain pump.
It’s variable speed, submersible and it has a number of included barb sizes including a 3/8″.

Note that the current picture shows a slightly different pump.  My guess is that that this is a stock image issue and that the current pump looks just like my pump.  Either way it doesn’t really matter as long as it functions the same way and has the same specs.

I picked up the rest of the fittings from Midwest Supplies.

Liquid Post - $11.99
Standard liquid post to attach the pump to your draft line quick disconnects.  You may already have an extra one of these around.


Cornelius Plug Adapter – 1/4″ MPT - $12.99
The liquid post screws into this.

3/8″ Barbed to 1/4″ FPT Elbow - $6.49

Put some teflon tape on the MPT side of the Cornelius plug adapter and attach this FPT elbow to it.  Note the design has changed on this just slightly since I put mine together.  Just a slightly different look.
This basically gives you a Corny keg quick disconnect post to 3/8″ barb converter.  

Now you’ll attach a length of 3/8″ ID tubing to this followed by the included 3/8″ pump adapter.  As far as sizing the length of 3/8″, use enough tubing to allow your draft lines to reach the bottom of a bucket you will use for reservoir liquid.


Assembled


The only thing that’s left is routing the faucet discharge back to the recirculation bucket. I’ve found 1/2″ ID Silicone tubing works great for this. The size is perfect and the silicone is stretchy enough to easily fit on the faucet. It is a bit pricey, but you really only need a few feet of it, just enough to get from the faucet down to the reservoir bucket. I’m guessing any 1/2″ ID tubing would also work for this, but I can’t attest to it from experience.


This design cleans your whole draft system:
This design cleans the faucet, the shank, the quick disconnect and the tubing.  Some designs that I’ve seen have you removing the beer nut and placing the hand pump apparatus directly on the shank.  That’s some work disassembling and reassembling and it also skips the line and quick disconnect.

Additional Pictures:
 BLC solution after cleaning all of my faucets.  Umm… they needed cleaned I guess.  I recirculated for 15 to 20 minutes per faucet.


 Recirculating rinse water


Recirculating Star San


Pump and connection assembly

Flow Rate:
As I stated I wanted a slow, steady flow of solution.  Here’s a video illustrating what kind of flow I’m getting with 7′ of draft line.  The 132 gallon per hour pump is working great for me.


If you want a higher flow rate, I suggest moving up to next largest pump in this line.

According to the specs on that pump, that pump also has an included 3/8″ barb.

Also consider picking up some Beer Line Cleaner (BLC)….
BLC Beer Line Cleaner - $3.99

Pinned: *Craft Beer Week *Free $25 Gift Card *EdgeStar Kegerators *MWS: Free Shipping

More from Midwest:


MoreRecent FindsAmazonAmazon FillersMidwestDraftCleaningSanitationPumpsProjectsMy KegeratorTop Posts

Cooling Fan – 99 Cents [After Rebate] – DIY Stir Plate or Fermentation/Draft Circulation


PC Case cooling fan for 99 cents delivered (EDIT:Shipping is an additional charge) after rebate.  Check it out – Here


You could use this for a DIY Stir Plate or, possibly, to circulate air for consistent fermentation or draft temps.


On a related note, I have one of these on the way for my kegerator, in hopes of reducing the foam that I get on first pours.  I’m also planning to play around with it in my fermentation deep freeze.


Also Consider


Also ConsiderFree Shipping at Midwest Supplies - Includes Carboys


PinnedFree Ship at Midwest Supplies *Thermapen Sale *Keg Sale *Shelving *Stir Bars

Northern Brewer – How to Build a Keezer, Step by Step


Step by Step – building a Multi-Tap Kegerator out of a Chest Freezer.


Check it out – Here


PinnedGrowler *50% Off BWH *Refractometer *Free Ship Kits *Bicycle Key Chain Opener


Also Consider:

Reader Tip – Cooling Fan for DIY Stir Plate or Kegerator – $2.99 via Staples

Thanks to HBF Reader Steve for this tip!

via Staples.  Cooling fan that you could use to build a DIY Stir Plate.  I’m going to try using a similar fan for circulating air in my kegerator.  Waiting for my BrewBit to do that so I can do some temperature testing and logging.

Antec Cooling Fan – $2.99 – Free Site to Store Shipping

Also Consider:


Building a Recirculating Draft Line Cleaning Setup


The directions on most line cleaners call for recirculating the cleaner for some period of time.  Most cleaning kits that are out there include a hand pump operating one of these for 15 to 30 minutes, for each faucet, doesn’t sound fun.

To really clean your draft lines, you need to keep solution flowing for a length of time, not just fill and wait.  Initially I tried to clean my system by pushing line cleaner out of a keg.  This was a waste of CO2.  I also found it tough to keep solution running slowly enough to get enough contact time.  It’s easy to quickly push a cleaning or sanitizing solution through your system under CO2 pressure, but I found it to be a pain to try to do so slowly.  This also requires quite a bit of cleaning solution versus a recirculating pump.

I decided to put together a recirculating draft line cleaning pump setup.

First I needed a pump.  I have a utility pump that I use for various tasks around brewery.  I decided that that pump was too powerful.  I didn’t want to deal with foaming issues that I thought may be caused by the high flow this pump would produce.  I wanted something with less power that could slowly circulate liquid through draft lines.

After looking around, I settled on the EcoPlus-132 fountain pump.
It’s variable speed, submersible and it has a number of included barb sizes including a 3/8″.

Note that the current picture shows a slightly different pump.  My guess is that that this is a stock image issue and that the current pump looks just like my pump.  Either way it doesn’t really matter as long as it functions the same way and has the same specs.

I picked up the rest of the fittings from Midwest Supplies.

Liquid Post - $11.99
Standard liquid post to attach the pump to your draft line quick disconnects.  You may already have an extra one of these around.


Cornelius Plug Adapter – 1/4″ MPT - $12.99
The liquid post screws into this.

3/8″ Barbed to 1/4″ FPT Elbow - $6.49

Put some teflon tape on the MPT side of the Cornelius plug adapter and attach this FPT elbow to it.
This basically gives you a Corny keg quick disconnect post to 3/8″ barb converter.  

Now you’ll attach a length of 3/8″ ID tubing to this followed by the included 3/8″ pump adapter.  As far as sizing the length of 3/8″, use enough tubing to allow your draft lines to reach the bottom of a bucket you will use for reservoir liquid.


Assembled


The only thing that’s left is routing the faucet discharge back to the recirculation bucket. I’ve found 1/2″ ID Silicone tubing works great for this. The size is perfect and the silicone is stretchy enough to easily fit on the faucet. It is a bit pricey, but you really only need a few feet of it, just enough to get from the faucet down to the reservoir bucket. I’m guessing any 1/2″ ID tubing would also work for this, but I can’t attest to it from experience.


This design cleans your whole draft system:

This design cleans the faucet, the shank, the quick disconnect and the tubing.  Some designs that I’ve seen have you removing the beer nut and placing the hand pump apparatus directly on the shank.  That’s some work disassembling and reassembling and it also skips the line and quick disconnect.

Additional Pictures:
 BLC solution after cleaning all of my faucets.  Umm… they needed cleaned I guess.  I recirculated for 15 to 20 minutes per faucet.


 Recirculating rinse water


Recirculating Star San


Pump and connection assembly

Flow Rate:
As I stated I wanted a slow, steady flow of solution.  Here’s a video illustrating what kind of flow I’m getting with 7′ of draft line.  The 132 gallon per hour pump is working great in my opinion.


If you want a higher flow rate, the next larger pump in this line may do the trick.

According to the specs on that pump, that pump also has an included 3/8″ barb.

Also consider picking up some Beer Line Cleaner (BLC)….
BLC Beer Line Cleaner - $3.99

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Building a Simple Draft Line Flushing Setup


I use a recirculating draft line pump for cleaning my draft lines.  More information on that build - Recirculating Draft Line Cleaning Pump.  That setup has worked great for me for periodic deep cleaning.


The issue I ran into was the desire to periodically do a quick flush to clean or sanitize lines.  Two occasions in particular, first when a keg kicks.  Unless you sit there and run CO2, while beer and yeast splat out of your faucet, you’re left with some residual beer and possibly yeast and trub sitting in the line.  The second occasion is the desire to sanitize when putting a new keg on.  Although the recirculating pump works great, it is a bit of work to set it up and clean it after use.  I wanted something that I could use to quickly flush and/or sanitize lines.

I decided to come up with an easy quick line flushing setup to use in these occasions.

A 1 liter bottle acts as a liquid containment vessel.  For the cap interface, Initially I thought about using a Carbonator Cap or More Beer’s Kent Soda Bottle Cap, but eventually, I decided to go with a tire valve.

I just went to a local auto parts store to find a clamp-in style tire valve.  Similar to this.  You should be able to find a suitable valve for $3 to $4.
Note: I’m not suggesting this exact part.  It may work, but I’m not sure if it will fit in a 1 or 2 L bottle cap.  I’d suggest gathering the other parts first.  Then take your cap and a small length of tubing to your local auto parts store to find something suitable.

The first thing you’re going to want to do is drill a hole in the cap so that the tire stem fits through it snugly   The tire stem should contain a rubbing oring to produce and airtight seal.  I happened to have a food safe Buna N oring around that worked well.  The clamp in tire valve will have a nut that goes on the other end of the cap to lock everything together.

You should have something like this:

The inside of the cap should look something like this:

Next you’re going to want to use a valve core removal/installation tool to remove the tire valve core.  That core functions as a one way check valve.  We’re not making a tire, so we don’t need or want that.

At this point we have a completed cap.  Next we need tubing and a mechanism to connect to draft lines.  For tubing, I found that 1/4″ ID tubing fit on my tire valve nicely.

The remainder of the parts can be seen in this photo:

All parts are via Midwest Supplies:

Liquid Post – Cornelius-Spartan, Super Champion & R Kegs 5200 – $10.49


Cornelius Plug Adapter-1/4″ FFL x 19/32″ 5203 – $9.99


1/4″ MFL to 1/4″ Barb S6017 – $2.99

Note: As you can see from the pictures, these parts are for a ball lock setup.  You can use the same concept for your pin lock setup.  If you do, let us know what parts you used and we’ll update this post.


Assemble those together and you’ll get this:

Connect the ball lock assembly with the cap assembly using 1/4″ ID tubing and some clamps to come up with the finished device.


I pressurized this unit and placed it on top of my kegerator, leaning up against my Bulldog Pegboard, because it’s amazing. :)

Here’s a video of this in action:

Some variations that I think would work:
  1. You could use a 2L bottle and skip the pressurization step, just squeeze to flush lines or sanitize.
  2. You could cut the bottom off of your bottle.  Hold this up in the air and pour rinsing, cleaning or sanitizing solution in.  The bottle is acting as a funnel and gravity feeds solution through your lines.
  3. You could also go with a 3L Bottle (available at a lot of dollar-type stores).  I went with a 1L size, for easy storage and also because I had it on hand.
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Recirculating Draft Line Cleaning Build


The directions on most line cleaners call for recirculating the cleaner for some period of time.  Most cleaning kits that are out there include a hand pump operating one of these for 15 to 30 minutes, for each faucet, doesn’t sound fun.

To really clean your draft lines, you need to keep solution flowing for a length of time, not just fill and wait.  Initially I tried to clean my system by pushing line cleaner out of a keg.  This was a waste of CO2.  I also found it tough to keep solution running slowly enough to get enough contact time.  It’s easy to quickly push a cleaning or sanitizing solution through your system under CO2 pressure, but I found it to be a pain to try to do so slowly.  This also requires quite a bit of cleaning solution versus a recirculating pump.

I decided to put together a recirculating draft line cleaning pump setup.

First I needed a pump.  I have a utility pump that I use for various tasks around brewery.  I decided that that pump was too powerful.  I didn’t want to deal with foaming issues that I thought may be caused by the high flow this pump would produce.  I wanted something with less power that could slowly circulate liquid through draft lines.

After looking around, I settled on the EcoPlus-132 fountain pump.
It’s variable speed, submersible and it has a number of included barb sizes including a 3/8″.

Note that the current picture shows a slightly different pump.  My guess is that that this is a stock image issue and that the current pump looks just like my pump.  Either way it doesn’t really matter as long as it functions the same way and has the same specs.

I picked up the rest of the fittings from Midwest Supplies.

Liquid Post - $11.99
Standard liquid post to attach the pump to your draft line quick disconnects.  You may already have an extra one of these around.


Cornelius Plug Adapter – 1/4″ MPT - $12.99
The liquid post screws into this.

3/8″ Barbed to 1/4″ FPT Elbow - $6.49

Put some teflon tape on the MPT side of the Cornelius plug adapter and attach this FPT elbow to it.
This basically gives you a Corny keg quick disconnect post to 3/8″ barb converter.  

Now you’ll attach a length of 3/8″ ID tubing to this followed by the included 3/8″ pump adapter.  As far as sizing the length of 3/8″, use enough tubing to allow your draft lines to reach the bottom of a bucket you will use for reservoir liquid.


Assembled


The only thing that’s left is routing the faucet discharge back to the recirculation bucket. I’ve found 1/2″ ID Silicone tubing works great for this. The size is perfect and the silicone is stretchy enough to easily fit on the faucet. It is a bit pricey, but you really only need a few feet of it, just enough to get from the faucet down to the reservoir bucket. I’m guessing any 1/2″ ID tubing would also work for this, but I can’t attest to it from experience.


This design cleans your whole draft system:

This design cleans the faucet, the shank, the quick disconnect and the tubing.  Some designs that I’ve seen have you removing the beer nut and placing the hand pump apparatus directly on the shank.  That’s some work disassembling and reassembling and it also skips the line and quick disconnect.

Additional Pictures:
 BLC solution after cleaning all of my faucets.  Umm… they needed cleaned I guess.  I recirculated for 15 to 20 minutes per faucet.


 Recirculating rinse water


Recirculating Star San


Pump and connection assembly

Flow Rate:
As I stated I wanted a slow, steady flow of solution.  Here’s a video illustrating what kind of flow I’m getting with 7′ of draft line.  The 132 gallon per hour pump is working great in my opinion.


If you want a higher flow rate, the next larger pump in this line may do the trick.

According to the specs on that pump, that pump also has an included 3/8″ barb.

Also consider picking up some Beer Line Cleaner (BLC)….
BLC Beer Line Cleaner - $3.99

This is a Top Post!  Check out Recent Posts - Here

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Making a Mash Tun Using More Beer’s Stainless Weldless Cooler Kit and an Igloo Cooler – $131.66


This Igloo 10 Gallon Beverage Cooler is a Top Find.  At it’s current price of $47.86 Shipped, it’s a great deal.  I have this exact cooler and paid quite a bit more for mine.


I have long recommended this cooler along with More Beer’s Weldless Cooler Kit – WL151.  That’s an all stainless cooler conversion kit.  I’ve made that recommendation confident that this kit would fit an Igloo cooler, in spite of the fact that More Beer explicitly says it’s for use in a Rubbermaid cooler.  I’ve finally gotten the chance to try this conversion kit myself in my Igloo 10 gallon cooler and I can tell you conclusively… it works!


Just pop out the stock spigot, or in my case a sad looking brass ball valve, and pop this thing in.  It looks and functions great.


 Close up on the Weldless Kit

As you can see from the photo below this has two stainless washers, a silicone oring and another stainless washer.  I put the first two washers on the outside of the cooler and the silicone oring and final washer on the inside of the cooler.  I tightened this all by hand to get a water tight seal.


Close up on the installed ball valve


Now we have an installed ball valve.  Next we need some sort of a false bottom.  I went with More Beer’s 12″ Domed False Bottom.


12″ false bottom

 Close up.  Stamped 304 Stainless!

 Just add a small piece of 3/8″ ID high temperature tubing to connect the
ball valve bulkhead to the false bottom.



As you can tell in this picture, the 12″ false bottom fills nearly the entire cooler.  The barb on the cooler kit side (the left side) needs to be out to fit the false bottom it.  I like that, everything fits nicely and this pretty much guarantees that the false bottom is going to stay in position.  Having said that More Beer’s pre-built 10 gallon mash tun, comes with a 9″ false bottom.  You could certainly go that direction with this build if you’d like.


I’m happy with the quality of these components and how well everything works when it’s all put together.  Having all stainless will also be a great upgrade.


If you’re going to put together a mash tun like this, you’ll need…


Amazon:

Igloo 10 Gallon Seat Top Beverage dispenser with spigot and Cup Dispenser – $47.86 Shipped


More Beer:
Weldless Cooler Kit (Stainless) WL151 – $37.95

Stainless Steel False Bottom (12″ Diameter) AG405 – $38.95

or

Stainless Steel False Bottom (9″ Diameter) AG403 – $32.95


Stainless – 1/2″ mpt x 3/8″ Barb H616 – $4.95

Threads onto the inside of the stainless cooler kit.

Tubing – Silicone (3/8″ ID) – By the Foot H983 – $1.95

You need just a few inches of this to connect the two barbs together + whatever length you want for draining your mash tun.

If you go with the 12″ false bottom, your More Beer order will total $83.80 Shipped.  Your Amazon order will total $47.86 Shipped.  That’s a total of $131.66.

If you go with the 9″ false bottom, your More Beer order will total $76.80 Shipped.  Your Amazon order will total $47.86 Shipped.  That’s a total of $124.66.

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Reader Photos: Rolling Kegerator using the Igloo Ice Cube MaxCold 70 Roller

Google+ Friend Keith has built a rolling kegerator using a recent Find.  He’s been kind enough to share some pictures with us.  Thanks Keith!

You could make do this as simply as putting a keg or two in this on ice and serving.  Obviously, Keith has taken it a lot further.  This would also make a sweet… cooler or a large mash tun.







This is marked down to $44.88.  That’s a 65% discount.  It has recently sold for just over $67.  Shipping is free.

Product Features

  • Unique, nearly cube-shaped 70-quart cooler keeps ice for five days
  • Smooth-rolling wheels, convenient locking and telescoping tow handle, and molded side handles for lifting
  • Deep foam insulated lid with two molded drink holders; recessed drain plug
  • Measures 18.6 by 23.5 by 20.3 inches (W x H x D); holds 114 12-ounce cans, and upright two-liter bottles; 14.5-pound weight
  • Includes limited one-year manufacturer’s warranty

Igloo Ice Cube MaxCold 70 Roller - $44.88 Shipped

Related Items:
2.5 Gallon Ball Lock Keg W/ Metal Handles – $79

Brand NEW 3 Gallon Cornelius Keg (Ball Lock) – $119

20 oz Paintball CO2 tank – $20

The Adapter CO2 regulator to Paintball Tank Adapter – $15

Brass Y Regulator Splitter – $8.99

RelatedAmazonAdventures in HomebrewingDraftPortable ServingProjectsReader PhotosReader ProjectsGreat Deals

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Reader How To: Making a Magnetic Drip Tray with Photos

HBF Reader Andrew sent me his step by step instructions for putting together a magnetic drip tray with this recent Find. Thanks Andrew!

Submit your photo of a great Find you found on Homebrew Finds!

4″ x 19″ Stainless Steel Drip Tray.  This is marked down 55% to $15.79.  Shipping is an additional charge.  I wouldn’t say shipping for me was cheap, but I noticed as I added items, it did not increase.  I’m guessing the seller Katom Restaurant Supply has a minimum shipping charge.

Update International DTS-419 4 in x 19 in Stainless Steel Drip Tray - $15.79 + Shipping

Instructions for a badass Kegerator or Keezer Drip Tray

By: Andrew Cunje

Materials:
  • 19″ Drip Tray
  • 4′ of 6x.5 Poplar Wood (actual width is 5.5″)
  • 1’4″ of  6×1 Poplar Wood (actual width is 5.5″) Note: A thicker wood will suffice for this…remember the longer the wood extends down from the joint, the less likely the magnetic bond will break from the leverage applied to the edge of the drip tray.)
  • 4-5ft of Decorative Trim of your choice (Sold in lengths of 8′)
    • MUST BE 1.25-1.5 inch trim. I used 1.5 which I highly recommend.
  • 3/4″ mounting screws (for magnets) or Epoxy/Gorilla Glue
  • 1″ wood screws
  • Brad/Finishing Nails
  • 1 large old skewl hard drive magnets (Bigger with Mounting Holes than newer drives) (Alternative: rare earth neodymium magnets that are .5″ thick (Approximately 8); these can be stacked if you can only find .25″ magnets)
  • Wood Glue
  • Wood Putty (Optional)
  • Wood Stain (Optional)
  • Tennis Racket Grip Tap (Or an old yellow rubber glove). Anything rubbery and tacky to increase friction against the fridge.

Tools Needed:

  • Beer
  • Measuring Tape & Straight Edge
  •  Pencil
  • Saw
  • Hammer
  •  Brad tool (to push head of brad beneath wood surface) (Optional)
  • Drill
  • Drill bits
  • Counter Sink Bit
  • Sand Paper

Directions:

  1. Wooden Drip Tray Base: Cut the 6″x.5″ poplar to the length of your Drip tray. This must be as long or longer to accommodate the trim added later. Sand burrs (This step will be omitted from all other wood cutting steps. This should be common sense, if it’s not, return all the stuff you bought and buy a pre assembled drip tray with mount for installation.)
  2. Front Drip Tray Trim: Cut the decorative trim to the length of the board you cut PLUS 2x the thickness (depth) of the trim. MEASURE TWICE CUT ONCE! For instance your front trim piece for the 19″ drip tray should be Length of drip tray + .25″ +.25″. This will allow the trim to hang over the length and cover the side piece of the drip tray.Note: If you accidentally cut this to the exact width of the drip tray, don’t fret. You will need this piece to fill the gap behind the drip tray.
  3. Side Drip Tray Trim: Cut the decorative trim to the width of the drip trap base depth. This should be 5.5″ inches! (a 6″x.5″ is actually 5.5″x.5″) You will need TWO of these (left and right side trims). You can optionally cut this to 6 inches to accommodate for the depth of the magnets…I choose  not to because I didn’t think of it at the time.
  4. Assemble upper Drip Tray Mount (Attach Trim to Wooden Drip Tray Base): The trim can now be attached to the base. I used Wood Glue and Brads. 2 brads on the sides and 4 on the front. I used a special tool to push the brad heads below the surface of the wood and filled with wood putty. Be sure to have a damp paper towel to clean up excess putty and wood glue.
  5. Drink beer now. You’re getting there.
  6. Create the Wooden L Bracket (Attaching the upper and lower portions of the wooden trip tray mount): Attach the upper drip tray mount to the 1’4″ of  6×1 Poplar Wood. I used 5 screws, evenly spaced to do this. I centered it and pre drilled all holes. Use the 1″ wood screws here and be sure to counter sink them. You can fill the countersunk screws with wood putty.Note: The length of wood that attaches to the kegerator should be >= the length that the drip tray extends away from the kegerator. simple physics, so you can negate the torque of the weights/load acting as a lever on your magnets!
  7. Rear plank torque extension plate: Attach approximately 6-8 inches of the excess 6x.5 (cut to length) to the center of the rear of the lower drip tray. Use your counter sink and 3/4″ screws here. This piece is crucial for stability of the mount. it ensures that additional grip is provided to the surface and minimizes the pressure points created by your magnets.
  8. Attach magnets evenly in the space left on the rear of the bracket. I placed them two inches from the end of this rear portion of the mount. User you 3/4″ screws here. I had to drill out the magnet bracket holes to get the screws to work. If your magnets don’t have mounting holes or you couldn’t acquire these old magnets…attach you alternative 1/2″ magnets with epoxy or gorilla glue…do not get it on the surface that will contact the fridge! Follow manufacturers dry times for that option. NO MATTER what magnets you use…they must be .5 inches…they have to be the same depth as the rear plan extension.Note: The magnet placement should be towards the top of the empty space…i did centered…which is much less efficient…but i still got 10# on it…probably don’t need more than that though!
  9. Get a grip: Finally, attach your tennis grip tape (or alternative) using 3m spray adhesive or double sided tape (The thinner the better) to the Rear plank torque extension plate and magnet surfaces that will contact your kegerator/keezer. This will prevent damage to the freezer surface and magnets. It will additionally increase the friction provided by your 2+ magnets to increase the holding power without having to go magnet crazy
  10. Insert your drip tray to your bracket…pretty self explanatory
  11. Fill the gap: Using your excess decorative trim, cut a piece of trim to the length of the first piece of wood you cut or the distance between the side trims. Place this between the drip tray (stainless steel) and the fridge. This will hide your screw holes and add to the pizzazz of your project
  12. Mount to fridge and test fitment…guess and check here…if magnets and rear plank make contact, you should be good to go for weight testing! Don’t use beer in case you totally mess it up. After all is good… pour a beer…rest it on your weight tested drip tray and admire your almost completed work.
  13. Take the tray off the fridge…with your beer in hand go outside and Stain or paint your drip tray as needed.
  14. TEH END!